brainwashing

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brainwashing

 [brān´wahsh-ing]
any systematic effort aimed at instilling certain attitudes and beliefs in persons against their will, usually beliefs in conflict with their prior beliefs and knowledge. It initially referred to political indoctrination of prisoners of war and political prisoners.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

brain·wash·ing

(brān'wash'ing),
Inducing a person to modify attitudes and behavior in certain directions through various forms of psychological pressure or torture.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

brainwashing

(brān′wŏsh′ĭng, -wô′shĭng)
n.
1. Intensive, forcible indoctrination, usually political or religious, aimed at destroying a person's basic convictions and attitudes and replacing them with an alternative set of fixed beliefs.
2. The application of a concentrated means of persuasion, such as an advertising campaign or repeated suggestion, in order to develop a specific belief or motivation.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
Any mental manipulation intended to change, and ultimately control, the mind of another person, who is held against his/her volition and subjected to psychologic pressure or torture
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

brain·wash·ing

(brān'wawsh'ing)
Inducing a person to modify his attitudes and behavior in certain directions through various forms of psychological pressure or torture.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

brainwashing

Concentrated and sustained indoctrination designed to delete a person's fundamental beliefs and attitudes and replace them with new, imposed data. It is questionable whether this intention can ever be fully realized.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005