Breakeven Analysis

(redirected from Break-even analysis)
Also found in: Financial, Encyclopedia.
A method used to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of purchasing new equipment or ‘buying into’ a new technology
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M2 PRESSWIRE-August 30, 2019-: Global Agriculture Technology as a Service Market 2019-2024: Focus on Service Type, Technology, Application, Pricing Models, Break-Even Analysis
Fitch also undertook a break-even analysis to understand the level of decline in gross rental revenue the asset could withstand and still be able to meet PILOT obligations.
The topics include cost and return analysis, partial budget analysis, break-even analysis, and financial cash flow analysis.
Major benefit of the break-even analysis is that it demonstrates the lowest level of business activity which would prevent revenue loss (GUTIERREZ and DALSTED, 1990).
This is also referred to as a recoupment or break-even analysis, which helps Veteran borrowers clearly understand the costs of refinancing, the monthly payment savings, and the overall impact on their finances.
GAO also recommends that claims specialists should avoid advising clients when to claim on a break-even analysis, which shows people how long they would have to live to make up for the fact that they are claiming benefits later.
In the long run, the operational expenses (opex) may be lower, but to truly understand the total cost of ownership (TCO) requires both a strong design and an initial cost model for the on-prem EVP, in order to have an accurate break-even analysis to power the TCO model.
diamond approaches and cloud computing; recent research on risk management; the Government Performance Results Act of 1993; break-even analysis; connections between the fiscal and substantive management side; how to translate resource needs into budgets and obtain and use financial advisory services; and changes based on the Governmental Accounting Standards Board Rule No.
A break-even analysis is conducted to compare the costs of making nanoparticles with the cost associated with buying them ready to use.
The break-even analysis compares the lower payment received each month if an early election is made with the larger payment received if the election is delayed.