rapeseed

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rapeseed

(rāp-sēd) [L. rapa, turnip]
The seed of Brassica campestris and other Brassica species, whose oil is used in the manufacture of lubricants and canola oil. The oil made from the seeds of the variety high in erucic acid is used as an industrial lubricant. Oil made from the seeds of the low-erucic-acid variety is relatively low in saturated fat and is commonly known as canola oil.
References in periodicals archive ?
Effects of salinity on yield and component characters in canola (Brassica napus L.) cultivar.
Karyotype and identification of all homoeologous chromosomes of allopolyploid Brassica napus and Its diploid progenitors.
Canola (Brassica napus L.) has been recognized as one of the most important oilseed crops and is the third most important source of the edible vegetable oil worldwide (Carvalho, 2011).
Gene transformation potential of commercial canola (Brassica napus L.) cultivars using cotyledon and hypocotyl explants.
Lead and zinc extraction potential of two common crop plants, Helianthus annuus and Brassica napus. Water, Air, and Soil Pollution 167: 5971.
& Risueno, M.C., Hsp70 and Hsp90 change their expression and subcellular localization after microspore embryogenesis induction in Brassica napus L.
Means ([+ or -] SE) of species richness (A) and total number (B) of flower visitors on Brassica napus in fire ant-excluded, fire ant-included, and fire-ant- and-aphid-included plots.
Impact of rate an timing of nitrogen application on yield and quality of canola (Brassica napus L.).
With regard to that some varieties of Brassica napus are grown increasingly in dry regions of Iran, it is important to examine drought-tolerance physiological reactions of different varieties of Brassica napus to determine the effective tolerance reactions and select the most tolerant species to be grown in water-stressed regions of Iran.
"Skinny Tan™ is proudly made with a 100% natural tanning active derived from the seeds of the Brassica napus plant", adds Cotton.
Earlier the most abundant pollen of Brassica napus and Salix caprea were identified in the honey from Central Lithuania (Ceksteryte, 2002; Baltrusaityte et al., 2007).