Moraxella catarrhalis

(redirected from Branhamella catarrhalis)

Mor·ax·el·la ca·tar·rha·'lis

a bacterial species that causes upper respiratory tract infections, particularly in immunocompromised hosts; the type species of the genus Moraxella.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

Moraxella catarrhalis

A fastidious, non-motile, gram-negative, aerobic diplococcus.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

Moraxella catarrhalis

A species that is a frequent cause of upper and lower respiratory tract infections, including otitis media in children and bronchitis and pneumonia in the elderly. It is resistant to beta-lactam antibiotics such as most penicillins, but can be treated with many cephalosporins, macrolides, and sulfa drugs.
See also: Moraxella
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Bista M et al [9] showed Streptococcus viridans and Streptococcus pneumoniae and in Agarwal A et al [14] Streptococcus viridans and Branhamella catarrhalis (71.13%).
Catlin, "Branhamella catarrhalis: an organism gaining respect as a pathogen," Clinical Microbiology Reviews, vol.
Shepherd, "A descriptive study of 42 cases of Branhamella catarrhalis pneumonia," American Journal of Medicine, vol.
Moraxella catarrhalis, also known as Micrococcus catarrhalis, Neisseria catarrhalis, or Branhamella catarrhalis is a gram-negative, aerobic, oxidase-positive diplococcus.
Branhamella catarrhalis: epidemiology, surface antigenic structure, and immune response.
Impact of antimicrobial therapy on nasopharyngeal carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Branhamella catarrhalis in children with respiratory tract infections.
An extract of Sambucus nigra L (black elderberry) was found to have antimicrobial activity in vitro against the gram-positive bacteria Streptococcus pyogenes and group C and G Streptococci, against the grarn-negative bacterium Branhamella catarrhalis, and against human influenza viruses.
The 3 most common bacteria in AOM are Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus species, and Branhamella catarrhalis. A recent study showed that both bacteria and viruses were isolated in the middle ear fluid of 65% of children with otitis media.
Hemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Branhamella catarrhalis, and Staphylococcus aureus were cultured in 66.7% of nasopharyngeal smears from group B, and in 46.5% from group A.
influenzae, and Branhamella catarrhalis, that might ordinarily overgrow other bacteria in culture.
[14] Several organisms in the pharynx may produce [Beta]-lactamase, most notably Staphylococcus aureus, S epidermidis, other coagulase negative staphylococci, Branhamella catarrhalis, Hemophilus influenzae, and anaerobes such as Bacteroides melaninogenicus, B buccalis, B buccae, and B fragilis; Fusobacterium species and actinomycetes.
Serum specimens from hospitalized patients with pneumonia were tested for antibodies to Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumolysin, pneumolysin immune complexes, C polysaccharide, surface protein A, Haemophilus influenzae, and Branhamella catarrhalis by Dr.