Branham

Bran·ham

(bran'ăm),
H.H., 19th-century U.S. surgeon. See: Branham sign.
References in periodicals archive ?
Yesterday, Branham protested his innocence, saying: "It was a genuine thing for Comic Relief.
These are the types of questions that Robert James Branham and Stephen Hartnett consider as they delve into the political, historical, and cultural aspects of God Save the King and, later, America or My Country 'Tis of Thee.
Pete Branham and Dave Smail from the transportation department at Fluor volunteered to be the instructors, and it has been a tremendous selling point for this class.
Mark Branham; Landing Signal Officer of the Year, Lt.
Lorraine Branham, a former executive editor of the Tallahassee Democrat who has been assistant to the publisher at the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette since fall 2000, is named director of the University of Texas School of Journalism in Austin.
"In the meantime," adds CEA staffer Linette Branham, "CEA and local affiliates are holding new teacher workshops to explain how the Association can help, and we've laid out, in great detail, a two-year portfolio preparation program, with a role for the local Association."
Pesticide not intercepted by plants is instead deposited in thatch or mat (Branham, 1994).
When Branham offered Pacific Packaging a trial, then, the machine maker was thinking that right-angle drives were probably all alike.
Felix Branham, of Silver Spring, Md., was among those who hit the beach at 0630 with Cota and Col.
"If you have more than four percent, you cannot call it beer," said Jim Branham, chief consultant to the Assembly Governmental Organization Committee.
Branham Group, a global ICT industry analyst and strategic marketing company, tracks thousands of companies throughout the year, and its Branham300 ranking is the best known and most referenced listing of Canada's ICT companies.