neuroimaging

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neuroimaging

(no͝or′ō-ĭm′ĭ-jĭng, nyo͝or′-)
n.
Radiological imaging that depicts brain structure or function.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

neuroimaging

Imaging
1. Any imaging technique–eg, PET scans, functional MRI, used to evaluate functional aspects of neural activity  .
2. Images obtained from the head which detect any abnormal mass, but which do not identify a specific type of tumor.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

neuroimaging

(noor?o-im'a-jing) [ neuro- + imaging]
The visual or graphic representation of the anatomy, blood flow, electrical activity, metabolism, oxygen usage, receptor sites, or other physiological functions of the central nervous system.

volumetric neuroimaging

Volumetric brain imaging.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

Neuroimaging

The use of x ray studies and magnetic resonance imaging (MRIs) to detect abnormalities or trace pathways of nerve activity in the central nervous system.
Mentioned in: Phobias
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Most recently, Just created brain-reading techniques to use neural representations of social thoughts--such as hugging or praising--to predict autism diagnoses with 97% accuracy.
However, Gallant's lab cautions that "[t]he potential use of this technology in the legal system is questionable," because "[a]ny brain-reading device that aims to decode stored memories will inevitably be limited not only by the technology itself, but also by the quality of the stored information.
The brain-reading device would incorporate a nano-sized electrode coated with a membrane that would mimic the receptor proteins found on the outside of brain cells.
The researchers called for an urgent debate into the ethical issues surrounding future uses of the brain-reading technology.