neuroimaging

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neuroimaging

(no͝or′ō-ĭm′ĭ-jĭng, nyo͝or′-)
n.
Radiological imaging that depicts brain structure or function.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

neuroimaging

Imaging
1. Any imaging technique–eg, PET scans, functional MRI, used to evaluate functional aspects of neural activity  .
2. Images obtained from the head which detect any abnormal mass, but which do not identify a specific type of tumor.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

neuroimaging

(noor?o-im'a-jing) [ neuro- + imaging]
The visual or graphic representation of the anatomy, blood flow, electrical activity, metabolism, oxygen usage, receptor sites, or other physiological functions of the central nervous system.

volumetric neuroimaging

Volumetric brain imaging.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

Neuroimaging

The use of x ray studies and magnetic resonance imaging (MRIs) to detect abnormalities or trace pathways of nerve activity in the central nervous system.
Mentioned in: Phobias
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
If a health care facility already has brain-scanning equipment available, can charge patients additional fees to undergo scanning, or will be able to use brain scanning as a replacement diagnostic tool for some patients, the burden of providing brain-scanning devices to vegetative state patients will be lightened.
Aside from the cost of purchasing and maintaining equipment, hospitals may also face administrative burdens if they have to perform repeat brain scanning of any patient.
(200) Finally, once the science behind using brain scanning to detect consciousness is supported by adequate data, brain scanning may replace current diagnostic techniques for assessing vegetative and minimally conscious state patients.
Common-sense arguments and the language of the ADA cut against any claim that brain scanning cannot be required because it might not work.
(140.) The only vegetative state patients who have experienced any chance to communicate are Scott Routley and the few other patients who took part in scientific studies, were found able to communicate through brain scanning, and were given the chance to answer questions.