braille

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braille

 [brāl]
an alphabet system for the blind, consisting of raised dots that can be felt with the fingertip.
Braille alphabet based on six-dot system. From Stein et al., 2000.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

braille

(brāl),
A system of writing and printing by means of raised dots corresponding to letters, numbers, and punctuation to enable the blind to read by touch.
[Louis Braille, French teacher of blind, 1809-1852]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

Braille

Alphanumeric writing designed for the vision impaired; characters are encoded and typed in relief, so properly trained fingers can “read” written communication.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

Braille

Public health Alphanumeric writing designed for the vision impaired; characters are encoded and typed in relief so properly trained fingers can “read” written communication. Cf Americans with Disabilities Act, Service dog.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

braille

A method of coding information using groups of six raised spots embossed on paper, to enable the blind to read through touch. (Louis Braille, 1809–1852, French school teacher).
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Braille,

Louis, French educator, 1809-1852.
Braille - system of raised dots placed in patterns to allow the blind to read.
Braillophone - a combination telephone and braille system.
Medical Eponyms © Farlex 2012

Braille 

System of printing for blind persons, consisting of points raised above the surface of the paper used as symbols to indicate the letters of the alphabet. Reading is accomplished by touching the points with the fingertips.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann