braille

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braille

 [brāl]
an alphabet system for the blind, consisting of raised dots that can be felt with the fingertip.
Braille alphabet based on six-dot system. From Stein et al., 2000.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

braille

(brāl),
A system of writing and printing by means of raised dots corresponding to letters, numbers, and punctuation to enable the blind to read by touch.
[Louis Braille, French teacher of blind, 1809-1852]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

Braille

Alphanumeric writing designed for the vision impaired; characters are encoded and typed in relief, so properly trained fingers can “read” written communication.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

Braille

Public health Alphanumeric writing designed for the vision impaired; characters are encoded and typed in relief so properly trained fingers can “read” written communication. Cf Americans with Disabilities Act, Service dog.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

braille

A method of coding information using groups of six raised spots embossed on paper, to enable the blind to read through touch. (Louis Braille, 1809–1852, French school teacher).
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Braille,

Louis, French educator, 1809-1852.
Braille - system of raised dots placed in patterns to allow the blind to read.
Braillophone - a combination telephone and braille system.
Medical Eponyms © Farlex 2012

Braille 

System of printing for blind persons, consisting of points raised above the surface of the paper used as symbols to indicate the letters of the alphabet. Reading is accomplished by touching the points with the fingertips.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann
References in periodicals archive ?
"The keys are softer and don't require as much pressure to press as those on other braillers, so Leo is finding it much faster and easier to use.
Teachers may use special tools that involve some added training for students, including audio material ("talking books"), special clocks and watches, braillers and transcribers, and sensory training devices.
The method of Brailling differs as some institutions use Perkins Braillers while others use embossing machines.
On the WJ-III (Woodcock et al., 2001), completed using the braille adaptation version as well as with an abacus and Perkins Brailler, Kim's standard scores were 97 for Brief Reading, 95 for Reading Comprehension, 81 for Brief Math, 92 for Math Reasoning, and 98 for Basic Writing Skills.
Initial writing lessons consisted of Ajay learning to load paper and operate the brailler independently, skills he mastered in a matter of weeks.
The reflections on the preliminary stages showed that Cathy was not using a brailler because of her left hemiplegia, and as a result she did not know braille at all.
Since UEB is already being used internationally, it is built into current Duxbury Braille Translation software, popular refreshable braille devices, and the Mountbatten Brailler. Pepole who use iPhones or iPads with refreshable braille displays who are eager to start using UEB right away can do so, because it is available in the Voice Over screen reader that comes with every computer or mobile device sold by Apple; one simply has to change the regional settings to a country that is already using UEB, such as Australia or New Zealand.
All but one started with the Perkins Brailler; one student who started braille instruction at age 12 began writing with a Braille n' Speak.