Braille

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braille

 [brāl]
an alphabet system for the blind, consisting of raised dots that can be felt with the fingertip.
Braille alphabet based on six-dot system. From Stein et al., 2000.

braille

(brāl),
A system of writing and printing by means of raised dots corresponding to letters, numbers, and punctuation to enable the blind to read by touch.
[Louis Braille, French teacher of blind, 1809-1852]

Braille

[brāl, brä′yə]
Etymology: Louis Braille, French teacher of the blind, 1809-1852
a system of printing for the blind consisting of raised dots or points that can be read by touch.

Braille

Alphanumeric writing designed for the vision impaired; characters are encoded and typed in relief, so properly trained fingers can “read” written communication.

Braille

Public health Alphanumeric writing designed for the vision impaired; characters are encoded and typed in relief so properly trained fingers can “read” written communication. Cf Americans with Disabilities Act, Service dog.

braille

A method of coding information using groups of six raised spots embossed on paper, to enable the blind to read through touch. (Louis Braille, 1809–1852, French school teacher).

Braille,

Louis, French educator, 1809-1852.
Braille - system of raised dots placed in patterns to allow the blind to read.
Braillophone - a combination telephone and braille system.

Braille 

System of printing for blind persons, consisting of points raised above the surface of the paper used as symbols to indicate the letters of the alphabet. Reading is accomplished by touching the points with the fingertips.

Braille (brāl),

n.pr a printing and writing system using elevated dots to represent letters. The system allows those individuals with limited or no visual ability to read via touch.
References in periodicals archive ?
The keys are softer and don't require as much pressure to press as those on other braillers, so Leo is finding it much faster and easier to use.
Slates and stylus, the writing frames, and Perkins Braillers are all in heavy demand but in short supply in the country.
Tuck Tinsley, APH President, says, "We are proud and thrilled to present the Next Generation Perkins/APH Brailler to the world today in Louisville.
Moreover, DepEd will earmark 25 percent for the procurement of assistive technology devices like Perkins Brailler, Braille display, speech synthesizer, canes, magnifiers, writing slate and stylus, abacus, Job Access with Speech program (JAWS), computer, sports, musical instruments, speech trainer, vestibular balls, sensory integration materials, early stimulation devices, adapted PE apparatuses, sewing machines, stove, cooking wares, and carpentry tools for the work centers/transition program.
2001), completed using the braille adaptation version as well as with an abacus and Perkins Brailler, Kim's standard scores were 97 for Brief Reading, 95 for Reading Comprehension, 81 for Brief Math, 92 for Math Reasoning, and 98 for Basic Writing Skills.
Initial writing lessons consisted of Ajay learning to load paper and operate the brailler independently, skills he mastered in a matter of weeks.
The reflections on the preliminary stages showed that Cathy was not using a brailler because of her left hemiplegia, and as a result she did not know braille at all.
Since UEB is already being used internationally, it is built into current Duxbury Braille Translation software, popular refreshable braille devices, and the Mountbatten Brailler.
Box 1 Tools used by students to complete schoolwork BrailleNote Braille Plus Computer with Jaws Computer with WindowEyes Computer with MAGIC Victor Reader Victor Wave Victor Stream Victor Vibe BookPort OCR scanner Electronic braille embosser Brailliant 24 Cell phone with Mobile Speak Digital recorder GPS system Perkins brailler Braille label maker Cassette tape player Books on tape Books on CD Large Print Talking Calculator Electronic books from BookShare RFB&D and WebBraille Franklin Language Master/Talking Dictionary
The majority of participants had sought additional training on the devices listed in the survey, and some sought additional training in the Bookport (APH), Mountbatten brailler, augmentative communication devices, switches, talking tactile tablet, and iPad.
Discussion: The study did not reveal consistent differences among the students between the outcomes of instruction with the traditional Perkins Brailler and paper or the electronic braille notetaker with a refreshable braille display.