braille

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braille

 [brāl]
an alphabet system for the blind, consisting of raised dots that can be felt with the fingertip.
Braille alphabet based on six-dot system. From Stein et al., 2000.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

braille

(brāl),
A system of writing and printing by means of raised dots corresponding to letters, numbers, and punctuation to enable the blind to read by touch.
[Louis Braille, French teacher of blind, 1809-1852]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

Braille

Alphanumeric writing designed for the vision impaired; characters are encoded and typed in relief, so properly trained fingers can “read” written communication.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

Braille

Public health Alphanumeric writing designed for the vision impaired; characters are encoded and typed in relief so properly trained fingers can “read” written communication. Cf Americans with Disabilities Act, Service dog.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

braille

A method of coding information using groups of six raised spots embossed on paper, to enable the blind to read through touch. (Louis Braille, 1809–1852, French school teacher).
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Braille,

Louis, French educator, 1809-1852.
Braille - system of raised dots placed in patterns to allow the blind to read.
Braillophone - a combination telephone and braille system.
Medical Eponyms © Farlex 2012

Braille 

System of printing for blind persons, consisting of points raised above the surface of the paper used as symbols to indicate the letters of the alphabet. Reading is accomplished by touching the points with the fingertips.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann
References in periodicals archive ?
NUMBRL is basically a numeric code that represents the dot patterns in Braille cells. Each dot in a cell has a fixed position value (Figure 2b).
Since braille reading proceeds by a serial and exhaustive traverse of a sequence of braille ceils, with fingerpads not in contact with more than one whole braille cell at any instant, one may suspect that whole words cannot be the units of processing.
Once students understand the structure of the braille cell, a collection of small magnetic dots and magnetic boards (or cookie sheets) work well as a center activity in the classroom.
In many cases, Nemeth Code might employ two 6-dot braille cells for a particular character, while a braille terminal would substitute a single 8-dot braille cell instead.
The participants' target behaviors commenced on a wooden braille cell to demonstrate the letters and sounds (randomly) prior to instruction with the braille cards.
When he joined the braille program, Tucker knew nothing about braille and doubted his ability to decipher this complex communication code made up of six-dot braille cells. He had little work experience--mostly painting and repairing cars--and even less confidence in his capacity to learn.
Refreshable braille displays are devices that attach to the front of a keyboard and have a series of pins arranged in 2x4 braille cells; typically they are 40--80 braille characters wide.
There are some fundamental differences between print and braille which affect the use of a braille display: braille letters are considerably larger than normal sized print text and refreshable braille cells (the braille is produced by raising and lowering pins to produce braille cells) are a relatively new technology.
A BrailleNote Apex, a notetaker commonly used by people with visual impairments and equipped with 32 braille cells, costs $6,195 (National Federation of the Blind, Technology Resource List, n.d.).
In 2001, as her son began to learn braille, she began to create jewelery featuring metal braille cells. The People's Design Award, whose winner is nominated and selected by visitors to the museum's web site, was inaugurated in 2006 by the Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum.
There is no way to determine if the one page of braille required by one instructor is equivalent to the one page of braille required by another, since specific descriptions of what either participant meant by the size of the page, spacing between lines, the number of braille cells filled, and the like were not provided.
Surcharges from the sale of the coin, which features an image of Louis Braille and full-size braille cells that spell out "Braille," will be donated to the National Federation of the Blind to further its programs to promote braille literacy.