Bragg curve

(redirected from Bragg peak)
Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Bragg curve

Etymology: William H. Bragg, English physicist, 1862-1942
the path followed by ionizing particles used in a radiation treatment. Because certain particles reach a peak of potential near the end of their path, the Bragg curve can be used to direct the radiation to deep-seated tumors while significantly sparing normal overlying tissues.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pole figures were performed Bragg peak to determine the true value of 2th as shown in Figure 1.
The rightmost Bragg peak (along the horizontal x-axis) is of interest here in order to avoid any gravity effect.
It is obvious that if the target's velocity is very small or the incident angle is small, the Doppler frequency peak of the target will be submerged in the Bragg peak.
We have made seismological considerations on the position dependence of the wave, and revealed that the wave-source motion was mostly isotropic expansion at the end of the range or the Bragg peak.
Precise targeting of the Bragg peak is of paramount importance in proton therapy because there is a sudden release of energy within the Bragg peak, but minimal energy release proximal to the Bragg peak and virtually none distal to it.
For example, a good understanding of the profile line shape through a fundamental parameters technique pays dividends in obtaining a good fit to the Bragg peak shape.
The scattering for a nuclear Bragg peak always preserves the spin alignment of the neutron (non-spin-flip scattering), while the magnetic cross sections depend on the relative orientation of the neutron polarization P and the reciprocal lattice vector [tau].
In an ideal modulated structure, each spot, including t he satellites, is a Bragg peak, indexed with more than three, usually four, numbers.
Thus the random intensity at a particular [omega] is proportional to an integral over the Bragg peak scan, the integration limits (2[[theta].
One clearly observes that the diffraction Bragg peaks broaden, with increasing milling time.
Figure 2 shows the [theta]-2[theta] XRD patterns of the TiN/TiSiN and CrN/CrSiN coatings with the Bragg peaks being labeled with the corresponding phases and lattice planes.