Bragg curve

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Bragg curve

Etymology: William H. Bragg, English physicist, 1862-1942
the path followed by ionizing particles used in a radiation treatment. Because certain particles reach a peak of potential near the end of their path, the Bragg curve can be used to direct the radiation to deep-seated tumors while significantly sparing normal overlying tissues.
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The volume fraction of material in a particular textured population is characterized by joining together the results of two diffraction measurements, the first being the intensity of a Bragg peak diffracted by the textured planes, and the second being the width of the texture profile measured using that peak.
Typically, experimentalists make their initial estimates of texture from the relative intensities of Bragg peaks in conventional [theta]-2[theta] x-ray diffraction (XRD) scans, comparing peak intensities wit h those obtained from untextured (random) specimens.
6 [mu]m thick electrodeposited Cu films was investigated with two [omega] scans, using 111 and 222 Bragg peaks (3).
The rightmost Bragg peak (along the horizontal x-axis) is of interest here in order to avoid any gravity effect.
The standard deviation of the simulated Bragg peak along the horizontal axis is calculated numerically using the 2D Gaussian fit and using the second moment method; then these values are compared to the analytical estimate using Eq.
In order to observe and account for Bragg peak broadening (and distortion) due to sample structure, an asymmetric single-crystal simulated sample corresponding to a = b = 480 A but c = 250 A is used.
To assess the impact of a Bragg peak or a region of the diffraction pattern on the overall fit to the data, we need to assess the cumulative impact over that region.
If we have an intense Bragg peak at low angles and are uncertain about our errors then [t.
2, which showed Bragg peaks and rules out exfoliation.
The absence of Bragg peaks in EVA18 nanocomposites WAXS (Fig.
002) [Angstrom] by measuring the angular difference between the Bragg peaks of the dispersive and nondispersive crystal orientations.
Bragg peaks from ground-and-polished alumina surfaces were investigated with 8 keV x rays at incidence angles from 0.