bradycardia

(redirected from Bradyarrhythmias)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Bradyarrhythmias: bradycardia, brachycardia

bradycardia

 [brad″e-kahr´de-ah]
slowness of the heartbeat, so that the pulse rate is less than 60 per minute. This can occur in normal persons, particularly during sleep; trained athletes also usually have slow pulse and heart rates. adj., adj bradycar´diac.
fetal bradycardia a fetal heart rate of less than 120 beats per minute, generally associated with hypoxia; it is usually due to placental insufficiency; it may also result from transfer of local anesthetics or beta-adrenergic blocking agents, and rarely to heart block associated with congenital heart disease or maternal collagen vascular disease.
nodal bradycardia bradycardia in which the stimulus of the heart's contraction arises in the atrioventricular node or common bundle.
sinoatrial bradycardia (sinus bradycardia) a slow sinus rhythm, with a heart rate of less than 60 beats per minute in an adult; it is common in young adults and in athletes but is also a manifestation of some disorders.
bradycardia-tachycardia syndrome any cardiac dysrhythmia characterized by alternating slow and fast heart rates, often resulting in hemodynamic compromise. See also sick sinus syndrome.

bra·dy·car·di·a

(brad'ē-kar'dē-ă),
Slowness of the heartbeat, usually defined (by convention) as a rate under 50 beats/minute.
[brady- + G. kardia, heart]

bradycardia

(brăd′ĭ-kär′dē-ə)
n.
Slowness of the heart rate, usually fewer than 60 beats per minute in an adult human.

brad′y·car′dic (-dĭk) adj.

bradycardia

Slow heart rate, commonly defined as a rate of < 60 bpm or a rate which is too slow to be physiologically appropriate for the person and/or activity (generally recognised as < 45 beats/minute in men, < 50 beats/minute in women). A notable exception is aerobic athletes, whose resting heart rates are significantly lower than those of non-athletes.
 
Clinical findings
Symptoms may be specific (syncope) or nonspecific (dizziness, fatigue, weakness, heart failure).
 
Management
Beta blockers (pindolol), pacemaker.

bradycardia

Cardiology Slow heart rate; commonly defined as a rate < 60 bpm or a rate that is too slow to be physiologically appropriate for the person and/or activity; alternatively< 45 beats/min in ♂; <50 beats/min in ♀Clinical Sx may be specific–syncope, or nonspecific–dizziness, fatigue, weakness, heart failure Management Beta blockers–pindolol, pacemaker. See Cardiac output.

bra·dy·car·di·a

(brad'ē-kahr'dē-ă)
Slowness of the heartbeat, usually a rate less than 60 beats per minute.
Synonym(s): brachycardia.
[brady- + G. kardia, heart]

bradycardia

A slow heart rate. In the healthy this often indicates a high degree of fitness, but bradycardia can be a sign of heart disease, such as heart block, an effects of digitalis or beta-blocker overdosage or the result of thyroid underaction (MYXOEDEMA).

bradycardia

an abnormal reduction in heart rate.

Bradycardia

A slow heart rate. Bradycardia is one of the two types of arrhythmia

bra·dy·car·di·a

(brad'ē-kahr'dē-ă)
Slowness of the heartbeat, usually under 50 beats/minute.
[brady- + G. kardia, heart]

Patient discussion about bradycardia

Q. What is considered a slow heartbeat? I am a 30 year old woman and I went for a routine checkup at my Doctor's. He checked my pulse and it was 52 beats per minute. Is this considered slow? All my family members have a faster beat of 65- 90 beats per minute. If it is slow, is it bad?

A. If the heartbeat is too slow, usually considered a rate below 60 beats a minute, not enough oxygen-rich blood flows through the body. The symptoms of a slow heartbeat are:

Fatigue
Dizziness
Lightheadedness
Fainting or near fainting

However, some people with slow heartbeat don't have any symptoms at all. Regular exercise can also result in a slow heartbeat. This happens because the exercise has actually strengthened the heart to the point where it can beat less often and still perform its job effectively. I am not a doctor, but it seems to me that in this case the slow heartbeat is not a cause for concern. If it troubles you, consult your doctor and see what he/she thinks about it.

Q. SVT and AF, Hearts that go fast to slow or any others probs with the beats of any kind and Ablation of hearts I have had Ablation done once and I am still having passing out spells and still on 50mg toprol 2 times a day till two days ago, now I am on 150 to 200 aday again. Its not the first time I have had to up meds. I had ablation down 4/22/05. I can breath better now but but it didnt take it away as you can tell. Now Dr Leonardie would like to do it again . This is the big ????! Will it or can it work 100% this time, or will it hit and miss some again???? MTT

A. Well I can understand the frustration of having to go through this procedure yet another time. There are no guarantees in medicine. You should follow your doctor's advice, as another proceudre might be more helpful than the last one. However you should keep in mind that nothing is for sure.

More discussions about bradycardia
References in periodicals archive ?
Post ablation the EKG objectified sinus bradyarrhythmia 45 / min, QRS axis at -45 degrees and a junctional extrasystole (Figure 3).
It seems also reasonable to identify patients with apnea-related bradyarrhythmias, since appropriate treatment may completely abolish its presence.
The 2011 warning also stated that citalopram should not be used in patients with congenital long QT syndrome, and that patients who have congestive heart failure or bradyarrhythmias, or are predisposed to hypokalemia or hypomagnesemia because of concomitant illness or drugs, are at higher risk of developing the arrhythmia.
Bradyarrhythmias in patients with OSA are related to the apnoeic episodes and over 80% are found during REM sleep.
Relation of daytime bradyarrhythmias with high risk features of sleep apnea.
Thus, her symptomatic bradycardia was no surprise, and similar cases of severe bradyarrhythmias have been described in patients on similar drug combinations.
They teach the interpretation of ECGs, beginning with anatomy and physiology of the heart, how the ECG is constructed, understanding the normal ECG, and steps for interpretation, then provide clinical examples of real ECGs of major cardiac conditions such as bradyarrhythmias, ectopic beats, atrial arrhythmias, tachyarrhythmias, ischemia and infarction, and inherited arrhythmia problems.
However, her condition deteriorated promptly with ventricular bradyarrhythmias and she died 14 hours after ingestion during hemodialysis.
* Consider frequent electrocardiogram monitoring for patients with congestive heart failure or bradyarrhythmias, or those on concomitant medications that prolong the QT interval.
American Heart Association guideline: Bradyarrhythmias and tachyarrhythmias.
Bradyarrhythmias are sometimes seen in OSA, in conjunction with obstructive apnoeas.