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The Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act of 1993, requiring background checks on prospective buyers via the National Instant Criminal Background Check System ("NICS"), arose from and memorialized an attempted presidential assassination.
Supreme Court ruled it unconstitutional for the federal government to direct state and local law enforcement officers to enforce certain provisions of the 1993 Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act.
Under theAaAaAeAeAaAeAeA Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act, the background checksAaAaAeAeAa gun purchases from federally licensed dealers and for permits to carry guns.
It took 12 years after the shooting before Congress finally approved what became known as the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act, which required background checks and waiting periods for many gun buyers.
In November, Congress enacts the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act.
In February 1994, the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act established a nationwide requirement that federally licensed firearms dealers impose a waiting period (later dropped) and initiate a background check for firearms sales.
Require the department of mental health to report to the National Instant Criminal Background Check System established by the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act of 1993 when a person is subject to hospitalization order or non-hospitalization order as the result of a mental illness which causes the person to be a danger to him or herself or others, or when a person is found not guilty of a crime by reason of insanity or incompetent to stand trial due to a mental illness.
U.S., when the Supreme Court found that provisions of the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act violated the 10th Amendment by compelling state police officers to run background checks until the federal system could be put into place.
As amended by the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act, 1993 (P.L.
The Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act (the Brady Act), which
The ATF has issued an open letter to all Kansas Federal Firearms Licensees (FFLs) advising them of a change to the procedure to comply with the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act, 18 U.S.C.
The Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act also creates a prohibited-possessor status upon a finding based on reasonable cause to believe, after a hearing with notice and an opportunity to participate, that an individual is a "credible threat" to the safety of an intimate partner or child.