Bradbury


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Brad·bur·y

(brad'bĕr-ē),
Samuel, U.S. physician, 1883-1947. See: Bradbury-Eggleston syndrome.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lastly, the cognoscenti who dismissed Bradbury as mass-market junk before warming to him may be compelled to reappraise their reappraisal.
Along the way, Bradbury peeks in on questions of competitive balance, dissects a few examples of free-agent contracts, and digs into the intricacies of player service time, arbitration eligibility, and free-agent status.
This makes both Hearne and Bradbury legible to the judge--one as an innocent child, the other as the perverse adult who corrupted him:
Bradbury may have been writing 50 years ago, but many of the technological devices described in "Fahrenheit 451" are similar to products in use today.
The inquest heard Mr Bradbury would have been trying to cross the A66 to get back to his home on the other side.
After two successful walks during 2005, the second raising $40,000 and garnering worldwide interest, the partners went looking for a concept for the 2006 GuluWalk with the objective that "anybody can get involved" said Bradbury.
How and when Bradbury tinkered with text overwhelms any discussion of why he did so.
Only one horse - Silver Fame in the 1940s and '50s - has won more (ten) Cheltenham races than Bradbury Star, who was placed 16 times and earned more than pounds 350,000 in prize-money.
Later this year Bradbury plans to write a new version of 'The Illustrated Man' for Columbia TriStar and a film version of 'Sound of Thunder', according to the Gold Coast Bulletin.
No wonder, then, that Bradbury was interested in computer printing.
STRIKER Lee Bradbury played a blinder - to maintain Steve Claridge's dream start as Pompey boss.
Then the floodgates opened, and Pompey striker Lee Bradbury stormed through them to hit a hat-trick.