dementia pugilistica

(redirected from Boxer's syndrome)

boxer's dementia

dementia resulting from cumulative damage sustained over some years in boxing, with slowed thought, memory loss, dysarthria, and other movement disorders.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

dementia pugilistica

(pyo͞o′jə-lĭs′tĭ-kə)
n.
A condition seen especially in boxers, caused by repeated cerebral concussions and characterized by weakness in the lower limbs, unsteadiness of gait, slowness of muscular movements, hand tremors, hesitancy of speech, and cognitive impairment.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
Boxers’ encephalopathy refers to the constellation of major neuropsychologic defects in amateur and career boxers—affecting 10–20% of the latter group—and is the cumulative result of recurrent brain damage and progressive communicating hydrocephalus due to extrapyramidal and cerebellar lesions. Wechsler and Bender Gestalt testing reveals variable organic mental disease and impaired short-term memory, dysarthria, nystagmus, reasoning ability, and motor skills. Acute boxing injuries include cerebral oedema, ischemia, and temporal or uncal herniation
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

dementia pugilistica

Traumatic dementia, i.e., encephalopathy or an organic brain syndrome caused by closed head injury. It is sometimes referred to colloquially as “boxer's brain.”
See also: dementia
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners