Bowenia


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Bowenia

a genus of Australian cycads in the plant family Stangeriaceae; contain cycad glucoside causing a staggers syndrome in cattle. Includes B. serrulata (Byfield fern), B. spectabilis (zamia fern).
References in periodicals archive ?
The Stangeriaceae consists of two genera: Bowenia (which comprises two species, both endemic to Australia) and Stangeria, which contains the single species S.
The volume is rounded out with another excellent contribution by Asmussen in a series of articles on Cycad and Macrozamia use, this time using the historical record to tease apart the differences in processing and use of seeds between Bowenia, Cycas, Lepidozamia and Macrozamia.
It draws on information contained in primary sources and many early historic documents to present Aboriginal names and meanings for various species of Bowenia, Lepidozamia and Macrozamia in Australia, to clarify the names of some Australian species, and to provide additional names for species and plant components not included in the compendium.
The order Cycadales comprises three families (Cycadaceae, Stangeriaceae and Zamiaceae), and 11 genera (Cycas, Stangeria, Bowenia, Dioon, Encephalartos, Macrozamia, Lepidozamia, Ceratozamia, Microcycas, Zamia and Chigua) (Stevenson 1992).
El orden Cycadales consta de tres familias: Cycadaceae, con el unico genero Cycas, ampliamente distribuido en S Japon, Archipielago Malayo, SE Asia, Filipinas, Indonesia, Nueva Guinea, N Australia, India, Sri Lanka, Madagascar y posiblemente la costa oriental de Africa; Stangeriaceae, con los generos Bowenia, de N.
Macrozamia is one of the four genera of cycads present in Australia: Bowenia, Cycas, Lepidozamia and Macrozamia (Jones 1998:14).
similarities with petioles of the extant cycad Bowenia spectabilis Hook.
and Bowenia, with a ring of vascular bundles and up to three concentric
Extant genera with cones are Bowenia, Ceratozamia, Chigua, Cycas, Dioon,
1990), such as Cycas, Bowenia, Encephalartos, Macrozamia, and
data indicate Bowenia and Stangeria are not closely related.
The provisional classification presented is based on a cladistic analysis; and the present authors think that, although certain aspects could be modified by the addition of new information, others - such as the recognition of Cycadaceae with Cycas, Stangeriaceae with Stangeria and Bowenia, and the Zamiaceae with two major clades (the Encephalartoideae, containing Dioon, Encephalartos, Lepidozamia, and Macrozamia; and the Zamiodeae, containing Ceratozamia, Chigua, Microcycas, and Zamia) - would remain unchanged.