inflammatory bowel disease

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Related to Bowel inflammation: ulcerative colitis, bowel infection

inflammatory bowel disease

 
any of various inflammatory diseases of the bowel whose etiology is unknown, including crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

inflammatory bowel disease (IBD),

general term for Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis, chronic disorders of the small and large intestine, of unknown cause, with conspicuous inflammatory features and distinctive but overlapping signs and symptoms.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

inflammatory bowel disease

n. Abbr. IBD
Any of several chronic disorders of the gastrointestinal tract, especially Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, characterized by inflammation and ulceration of the intestine and resulting in abdominal cramping and diarrhea.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

inflammatory bowel disease

A general term for the symptoms associated with specific types of inflammation of the large intestine, including Crohn's disease–CD, ulcerative colitis–UC as well as idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease, a diagnosis of exclusion that clinically and pathologically mimics and/or overlaps CD and UC Heredity First-degree relatives of Pts with CD and UC have an 8- to 10-fold ↑ risk of developing the same form of colitis DiffDx Ischemia, radiation, uremia, cytotoxic drugs, heavy metal intoxication; IBD Pts often have ≥ 2 of following: Visible abdominal distension, relief of pain upon defecation, looser and more frequent bowel movements when the pain occurs; ♂:♀ ratio, 2:1; more common in Jews; IBD is associated with mucocutaneous disease–pyoderma gangrenosa, erythema nodosum, oral ulcers, annular erythema, vascular thromboses, epidermolysis bullosa, ocular disease–uveitis, iridocyclitis, hepatopathy–CAH, cirrhosis, sclerosing cholangitis, arthropathy–ankylosing spondylitis. Cf Irritable bowel syndrome Treatment Corticosteroids—or corticotropin–favored by some clinicians, aminosalicylates–sulfasalazine and 5-aminosalicylic acid, immunomodulatory agents–azathioprine, mercaptopurine, cyclosporine, MTX, metronidazole, antibiotics and nutritional support–both more effective in Crohn's disease, resulting in ↓ Sx, ↓ inflammatory sequelae, improved nutritional status.
Inflammatory bowel disease  
Clinical  Ulcerative colitis Crohn's disease
Rectal bleeding  Common  Rare
Abdominal mass  Rare  10-15%
Abdominal pain  Left-sided  Right-sided
Abnormal endoscopy  95%  < 50%
Perforation  12%  4%
Colon carcinoma  5-10%  Rare
Response to steroids  75%  25%
Surgical outcome Excellent  Fair
Rectal involvement  > 95%  !0%
Radiology
Ileal involvement  Rare  Usual
Cross-hatched ulcers  Rare  Occasional
Thumbprinting  Absent  Common
Fissuring  Absent  Common
Skip areas  Absent  Common
Strictures  Absent  Common
Pathology
Distribution  Diffuse  Focal
   Superficial  Transmural
Mucosal atrophy Regeneration  Marked Minimal
Hyperemia  Often marked  Minimal
Crypt abscess  Common  Rare
Cytoplasmic mucin  Decreased  Intact
Lymphoid aggregates  Rare  Common
Lymph nodes  Reactive hyperplasia  -----
Edema  Minimal Marked
Granulomas  Absent  60%  
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

in·flam·ma·to·ry bow·el dis·ease

(IBD) (in-flam'ă-tōr-ē bow'ĕl di-zēz')
General term for Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis, chronic disorders of the small and large intestine, autoimmune, with conspicuous inflammatory features and distinctive but overlapping signs and symptoms.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)

Ulcerative colitis or Crohn's colitis; chronic conditions characterized by periods of diarrhea, bloating, abdominal cramps, and pain, sometimes accompanied by weight loss and malnutrition because of the inability to absorb nutrients.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1998, a scientific paper by Andrew Wakefield reported a pattern of bowel inflammation in 12 children who hadautism.
Treated mice developed less bowel inflammation than untreated mice, and after nine weeks more than half the mice not given vitamin D were dead.
Biologist Peter Parham at Stanford University calls the report a "landmark" that may help scientists uncover the mechanism causing these inflammatory diseases -- which include, among others, ankylosing spondylitis (fusion of spinal bones), an arthritis associated with the skin disorder psoriasis, and an arthritis accompanied by bowel inflammation. An understanding of how such conditions develop in humans might someday lead to more effective therapies, and perhaps even to preventive treatment.
In addition, orally administered PL-8177 had a significant effect on resolving inflammation in a rat bowel inflammation model.
A number of infectious, inflammatory, and treatment-related causes of small bowel inflammation can mimic Crohn's disease on imaging.
Altretamine is currently used to treat ovarian cancer, but these results suggest that, like sulfasalazine, it could be used for bowel inflammation or rheumatoid arthritis too.
In the study, pretreatment with probiotic therapy reduced inflammation in mice with stress-induced small bowel inflammation.
In the gut, excess lysozyme may be found in diseased mucosa due to bowel inflammation. In active inflammatory bowel disease, elevated fecal loss of lysozyme is expected as part of increased enteric protein loss.
The ground worker made an appointment with his family doctor and was offered a test to check for evidence of bowel inflammation.
Cevaer came into the week suffering a bowel inflammation possibly sparked by stress related to management problems.
Eugenol and apigenin, in basil, parsley and rosemary, have anti-flammatory qualities that can alleviate conditions such as arthritis, asthma and bowel inflammation.