tendon

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tendon

 [ten´don]
a cord or band of strong white fibrous tissue that connects a muscle to a bone. When the muscle contracts it pulls on the tendon, which moves the bone. Tendons are extremely tough and are seldom torn, even when an injury is severe enough to break a bone or tear a muscle. One of the most prominent tendons is the achilles tendon.
Frequently injured tendons. From Copstead, 1995.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ten·don

(ten'dŏn), [TA]
A nondistensible fibrous cord or band of variable length that is the part of the muscle (some authorities, however, consider it as part of the muscle complex), which connects the fleshy (contractile) part of muscle with its bony attachment or other structure; it may unite with the fleshy part of the muscle at its extremity or may run along the side or in the center of the fleshy part for a longer or shorter distance, receiving the muscular fibers along its border; when determining the length of a muscle, the tendon length is included as well as the fleshy part; it consists of fascicles of densely arranged, almost parallel collagenous fibers, rows of elongated fibrocytes, and a minimum of ground substance.
Synonym(s): tendo [TA], sinew
[L. tendo]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

tendon

(tĕn′dən)
n.
A band of tough, inelastic fibrous tissue that connects a muscle with its bony attachment.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

ten·don

(ten'dŏn) [TA]
A nondistensible fibrous cord or band of variable length that connects the fleshy (contractile) part of muscle with its bony attachment or other structure; it may unite with the fleshy part of the muscle at its extremity or may run along the side or in the center of the fleshy part for a longer or shorter distance, receiving the muscular fibers along its border; when the length of a muscle is determined, the tendon length is included; it consists of fascicles of very densely arranged, almost parallel collagenous fibers, rows of elongated fibrocytes, and a minimum of ground substance.
Synonym(s): sinew, tendo.
[L. tendo]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

tendon

A strong band of COLLAGEN fibres that joins muscle to bone or cartilage and transmits the force of muscle contraction to cause movement. Tendons are often provided with sheaths in which they move smoothly, lubricated by a fluid secreted by the sheath lining. Tendons may become inflamed, or may be torn or cut.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

tendon

a bunch of parallel COLLAGEN fibres making up a band of CONNECTIVE TISSUE which serves to attach a muscle to a bone. The fibres become continuous with the collagen sheath around the muscle fibres and with the connective tissue covering the bone surface, making a strong cord with no weak connections.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Tendon

A tough cord of dense white fibrous connective tissue that connects a muscle with some other part, especially a bone, and transmits the force which the muscle exerts.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

ten·don

(ten'dŏn) [TA]
Nondistensible fibrous cord or band of variable length that is part of muscles (some authorities, however, consider it as part of the muscle complex), which connects fleshy (contractile) part of muscle with its bony attachment or other structure.
[L. tendo]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Trainer Mark Johnston, after explaining that the five-year-old had been sidelined with a bowed tendon, said: "The big question is, will he stay sound?"
Morrison added: "He has broken his pelvis three times, had three bowed tendons and broken a small bone in a hind leg, but he's got a wonderful engine despite the problems.
The latter hasn't raced since finishing third behind Makybe Diva in the 2005 Melbourne Cup, since when the six-year-old has undergone stem-cell surgery for bowed tendons.