Bovarism

An imagined or unrealistic self-image with sexual overtones, which most commonly affects older single women, in which their fantasised world overlaps and becomes confused in their minds with the real world. The term has also been used to refer to the drive by a married woman to escape the boredom and obligations of her married life
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Academic Bovarism and the Pursuit of Legitimacy: Canon-Building in Romanian Political Science.
There is a predisposition to bovarism in every writer, difficult to refrain from, i.e., one's tendency to project an idealized, often illusory image of oneself, different from what one is in reality.
"Romania and the Balkans: From Geocultural Bovarism to Ethnic Ontology".
(36) Sorin Antohi, "Romania and the Balkans: From Geocultural Bovarism to Ethnic Ontology", Tr@nsit online, 21, (2002).
pioneering analysis of collective bovarism, the complex among the
Jaime represents the aristocracy that obsesses Luz, who suffers from a condition psychologist Jules de Gaultier coined as "bovarism," after Madame Bovary: a mistaken sense of admiration and belonging to a social sphere that is out of reach.
The so-called 'bovarism' is described in Segen's Medical Dictionary as "an imagined or unrealistic self-image with sexual overtones, which most commonly affects older single women, in which their fantasized world overlaps and becomes confused in their minds with the real world.
This "'geocultural Bovarism,' a disposition to leap frog" into Europe, was motivated by the "fear...that the country would fall right off the edge into another continent altogether" (Judt 2001, 10).