Borrelia hermsii

Bor·rel·i·a herm·si·i

a bacterial species found as a cause of relapsing fever in British Columbia, California, Colorado, Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington; transmitted by a tick, Ornithodoros hermsi.

Borrelia hermsii

The species of gram-negative spirochetes which may cause endemic tick-borne or epidemic louse-borne relapsing fever.
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ticks; Borrelia hermsii is thought to be the most common cause.
In North America, TBRF primarily is caused by Borrelia hermsii spirochetes transmitted by Ornithodoros hermsii ticks (1).
Of 39 attendees, 14 (36%) reported fever and at least one of several symptoms associated with the illness (chills, diaphoresis, headache, myalgia, arthralgia, rash, or tick bite) within 7 days after the event; 11 of those had laboratory confirmation of Borrelia hermsii infection (MMWR 52[34]:809-12, 2003).
Of 39 attendees, 14 (36%) reported fever and at least one of several symptoms associated with the illness (chills, diaphoresis, headache, myalgia, arthralgia, rash, or tick bite) within 7 days after the event; 11 of those (aged 4-80 years) had laboratory confirmation of Borrelia hermsii infection (MMWR 52[34]:809-12, 2003).
* Tick-borne Relapsing Fever and Borrelia hermsii, Los Angeles County, California, USA
Most TBRF cases in the United States are caused by Borrelia hermsii and transmitted by Ornithodoros hermsi ticks.
For a positive control, we used strain HS1 (ATCC 35209) of Borrelia hermsii because B.
Sequencing of polymerase chain reaction targets revealed 100% match to Borrelia hermsii. Testing of the newborn's serum also obtained May 7 did not detect B.
In North America, this zoonosis is associated with 3 species of spirochetes, but most human cases are caused by Borrelia hermsii, which is found in scattered foci in the western United States and southern British Columbia, Canada (5,6).
Reinfection of vervet monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops) with Borrelia hermsii. Res Commun Chem Pathol Pharmacol.
A case of TBRF was defined as laboratory-confirmed borreliosis (growth of Borrelia hermsii in blood culture or visualization of spirochetes on Giemsa- or Wright-stained peripheral blood smear) in a person who attended the gathering and had a fever.
DNA was extracted from the infected liver, and PCR-DNA sequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) locus identified the bacterium as a relapsing fever spirochete related most closely to Borrelia hermsii (1).