Borrelia


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Borrelia

 [bo-rel´e-ah]
a genus of gram-negative, aerobic, spirochete bacteria that are parasites on mucous membranes and cause borreliosis and other conditions. B. burgdor´feri, transmitted by ixodid ticks, is the cause of acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans, erythema chronicum migrans, and lyme disease. B. recurren´tis is transmitted by the human body louse Pediculus humanus and causes epidemic relapsing fever in various countries around the world. A number of other species are spread by tick bites and also cause relapsing fever.

Borrelia

(bō-rē'lē-ă, bo-rel'ē-ă),
A genus of bacteria (family Treponemataceae) containing cells 8-16 mcm in length, with coarse, shallow, irregular spirals and tapered, finely filamented ends. These organisms are parasitic on many forms of animal life, are generally hematophytic, or are found on mucous membranes; most are transmitted to animals or humans by the bites of arthropods. The type species is Borrelia anserina. Within the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex, three pathogenic groups have been identified in North America; all strains identified to date as human pathogens belong to the genospecies Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto.
[A. Borrel]

Borrelia

/Bor·rel·ia/ (bah-rel´e-ah) a genus of bacteria (family Spirochaetaceae), parasitic in many animals. B. burgdor´feri causes Lyme disease and skin disease, and numerous species cause relapsing fever.

Borrelia

(bə-rē′lē-ə, -rĕl′ē-ə)
n.
A genus of spirochetes that includes species that cause Lyme disease and relapsing fever.

borrelia

(bə-rĕl′ē-ə, -rē′lē-ə)
n.
Any of various spirochetes of the genus Borrelia that are pathogens of humans, other mammals, and birds, including the causal agents of Lyme disease and relapsing fever.

Borrelia

[bərel′ē·ə]
Etymology: Amédée Borrel, French bacteriologist, 1867-1936
a genus of coarse, unevenly coiled helical spirochetes, several species of which cause tick-borne and louseborne relapsing fever. The organism is spread to offspring from generation to generation. This does not occur in lice. Many animals serve as reservoirs and hosts for Borrelia. The spirochete may be identified by microscopic examination of a smear of blood stained with Wright's stain; it is also easily inoculated onto culture media for bacterial culture and identification.

Bor·rel·i·a

(bŏ-rel'ē-ă)
A genus of bacteria (family Treponemataceae) containing cells 8 to 16 mcm in length, with coarse, shallow, irregular spirals and tapered, finely filamented ends. These organisms are parasitic on many forms of animal life, are generally hematophytic, or are found on mucous membranes; most are transmitted to animals or humans by the bites of arthropods. The type species is B. anserina.
[A. Borrel]

Borrelia

A genus of spiral-shaped bacteria that includes the organism Borrelia burgdoferi responsible for LYME DISEASE and Borrelia recurrentis that causes RELAPSING FEVER. (Amedee Borrel, 1867–1936, Strasbourg bacteriologist).

Borrelia

a genus of spiral, gram-negative bacteria. The spirals have a long amplitude and are irregular.

Borrelia anserina
causes fowl spirochetosis.
Borrelia burgdorferi
causes lyme disease in humans and animals.
Borrelia recurrentis
causes relapsing fever in humans, and a subclinical disease in Virginia opossum, one of the major reservoirs of the disease.
Borrelia suilla
not an accredited species. Originally identified as a cause of ulcerative granuloma of swine.
Borrelia theileri
cause of theileriasis in cattle, sheep and horses.
References in periodicals archive ?
Por ELISA se detectaron 30 (20 %) sueros con anticuerpos IgG para Borrelia.
Routine diagnosis of Borrelia burgdorferi (sensu lato) infections using a real-time PCR assay.
Spirochetemia caused by Borrelia turicatae infection in 3 dogs in Texas.
Relapsing fever is also caused by spirochete bacteria of the genus Borrelia, of the group RFB.
Although the relationship of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato infection to Parry-Romberg syndrome has occasionally been reported, the role of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato in the development of Parry-Romberg syndrome is uncertain (2, 8-14).
Flagellum is very critical for the survival of Borrelia, whereas, a mutant deficient of flagellum turns into a rod shaped structure (Motaleb, 2000).
Lyme disease Borrelia has developed an unusual lifestyle in that they alternate between vertebrate and arthropod hosts.
Larvae hatch from eggs every August and may be infected with Deer Tick Virus and Borrelia miyamotoi.
An increasing number of ticks are infected with Babesia and Wasser's team is exploring evidence that the trend is connected to the rapid spread of Borrelia burgdorferi, the bacterium that causes Lyme disease.
Borrelia is a gram negative microorganism requiring two hosts for completing its life cycle: a mammal and an arthropod, the lattest an Ixodes tick (4).