boron

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bo·ron (B),

(bōr'on),
A nonmetallic trivalent element, atomic no. 5, atomic wt. 10.811; occurs as a hard crystalline mass or as a brown powder; forms borates and boric acid.
[Pers. Burah]

boron

A trivalent nonmetallic element, (atomic number 5; atomic weight 10.81).
 
Alternative medicine
Boron is believed by alternative health workers to be useful in pregnancy and menopause as it increases oestrogens; they also believe in boron deficiency.

Boron-rich foods
Almonds, beans, honey, lentils, peas, peaches, pears and raisins.
 
Molecular biology
A mutation of SLC4A11, which encodes a transporter that regulates intracellular boron levels, results in congenital endothelial dystrophy type 2, a rare form of corneal dystrophy.
 
Nutrition
Boron is non-toxic to humans; while boron is needed for certain cellular activities, a boron deficiency state is not known to exist.

Physics
Boron is used in physics as a neutron-absorber.
 
Physiology
Boron is a trace mineral needed for proper absorption and utilisation of calcium to maintain bone density, and may help prevent postmenopausal osteoporosis; daily supplements of boron may help retain dietary calcium, magnesium and phosphorus, and increase production of oestrogen and testosterone. It is also thought to safely promote muscle growth by body-builders.

bo·ron

(B) (bōr'on)
A nonmetallic trivalent element, atomic no. 5, atomic wt. 10.811; occurs as a hard crystalline mass or as a brown powder, and forms borates and boric acid. A nutritional need has been reported in pregnant women.
[Pers. Burah ]
References in periodicals archive ?
In his lecture, Suzuki gave an historical perspective of his reaction in the context of progress in boron chemistry, developed the theme of use of organoboron coupling reactions for the synthesis of dienes and biaryls, and, concentrating on work from other laboratories, provided an up-to-date report on the numerous applications of the Suzuki reaction inbioactive molecule and natural product synthesis.