taiga

(redirected from Boreal forests)
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taiga

the zone of forest vegetation lying on wet soils between the tundra in the north and steppe hardwood forest in the south, that encircles the northern hemisphere.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
In a fire-heavy year, fires in the boreal forests of North America, Russia, and Mongolia contribute up to 10 percent of the carbon dioxide returned to the atmosphere from fires worldwide, says fire ecologist Eric S.
This work suggested that as Earth's temperature dropped, about 25 percent of the land covered by boreal forests gave way to tundra.
Cindy Shaw, a carbon-research scientist with the Canadian Forest Service, studies the boreal forest -- the world's most northerly forest, which circles the top of the globe like a ring of hair around a balding head.
Washington DC [USA], Dec 30 ( ANI ): A study has recently revealed that charcoal remains after a forest fire may help decompose fine roots in the soil and consequently accelerate CO2 emissions in boreal forests.
Boreal forests are an important carbon sink on land.
A recent paper in Science magazine claims "large regions of the boreal forests could, by the end of the century, shift to the drier climate space normally occupied by the woodland/shrubland biome."
I am not sure if this person has ever been to the boreal forests of Canada, but the vegetation up there is the thickest I have ever known.
The raging wildfires are damaging the boreal forests of Canada.
For almost three decades (1973-99), ground squirrel populations in the boreal forests of the Kluane region (SW Yukon) cycled in a predictable manner (Werner et al., 2015b) in concert with the snowshoe hare (Lepus americanus-, Boutin et al., 1995).
Additional findings show the highest densities of trees were found in the boreal forests in the sub-arctic regions of Russia, Scandinavia and North America, but the world's largest forests are in the tropics, which is home to about 43% of the world's trees.
Canada's forests account for nine per cent of all forests and 24 per cent of boreal forests worldwide.
Deep soil organic horizons generally restrict germination of deciduous species in spruce-dominated boreal forests. Self-replacement by spruce is common during post-fire succession where fire intensity is low and a deep organic horizon remains (LeBarron 1939, Greene et al.