Bordetella pertussis


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Bor·de·tel·la per·tus·'sis

the bacterial species that is the causative agent of whooping cough, a respiratory tract infection that in infants and young children may be life threatening; the severe cough, progressing to a paroxysmal form after 7-10 days, is associated with production of pertussis toxin, a protein consisting of 5 B. subunits that bind the molecule to respiratory epithelial cells, and an A subunit, an ADP-ribosyl-transferase that interferes with proteins associated with normal signal transduction; pathology is also associated with heavy secretion of mucus and hypoxia due to paroxysmal coughing and to blockage of air passages with mucus.

Bordetella pertussis

A small, aerobic, gram-negative bacillus, which classically causes whooping cough. B pertussis produces various toxins including a dermo-necrotising toxin, an adenyl cyclase, an endotoxin and pertussis toxin, as well as surface components such as fimbrial haemagglutinin.

Clinical findings
Runny nose, sneezing, mild cough, low-grade fever.
 
Diagnosis
Culture, serology.

Bordetella pertussis

Microbiology A small, aerobic, gram-negative bacillus, causative organism of whooping cough; B pertussis produces various toxins including a dermonecrotizing toxin, an adenyl cyclase, an endotoxin and pertussis toxin, as well as surface components such as fimbrial hemagglutinin Diagnosis Culture, serology, clinical Rx

Bor·de·tel·la per·tus·sis

(bōr-dĕ-tel'ă pĕr-tŭs'is)
A bacterial species that causes whooping cough; it produces cell-destroying toxins and causes thick mucus to collect in the airway. The type species of the Bordetella genus.

Bor·de·tel·la per·tus·sis

(bōr-dĕ-tel'ă pĕr-tŭs'is)
A bacterial species that causes whoo-ping cough.
References in periodicals archive ?
Epitope mapping the Fim2 and Fim3 proteins of Bordetella pertussis with sera from patients infected with or vaccinated against whooping cough.
Pinelli, "Complement evasion by Bordetella pertussis: implications for improving current vaccines," Journal of Molecular Medicine, vol.
Wirsing Von Koenig, "Performance of commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for detection of antibodies to Bordetella pertussis," Journal of Clinical Microbiology, vol.
Genetic analysis of Bordetella pertussis isolates from the 2008-2010 Pertussis epidemic in Japan.
Gilmour, "Systemic administration of Bordetella pertussis enhances pulmonary sensitization to house dust mite in juvenile rats," Toxicological Sciences, vol.
The Bordetella Pertussis makes its way into the respiratory tract via inhalation and subsequently binds to and destroys the ciliated epithelial cells of the trachea and bronchi.
(6.) Wadowsky, Robert M, Inhibition of PCR-Based Assay for Bordetella pertussis by Using Calcium Alginate Fiber and Aluminum Shaft Components of a Nasopharyngeal Swab.
However, Bordetella pertussis is a fastidious organism and negative cultures do not rule out disease.
Estimating the role of casual contact from the community in transmission of Bordetella pertussis to young infants.
Topics include specialization in Bordetella as deduced from comparative genome analysis; the phylogeny, evolution and epidemiology of Bordetellae; the bvg regulon; Bordetella adhesins and toxins; Ptl Type III secretions in Bordetella subspecies; Ptl Type IV secretion systems; primary metabolism of physiology; bacteriophage and diversity-generating retroelements; biotechnological applications of the Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin; and pertussis vaccines.
The bacteria is very similar to Bordetella pertussis, which causes whooping cough in children.