booster shot

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booster shot

n.
An additional dose of an immunizing agent, such as a vaccine or toxoid, given at a time after the initial dose to sustain the immune response elicited by the previous dose of the same agent. Also called booster dose.

booster shot

Immunology A 2nd immunization dose, administered after an appropriate time interval, allowing the body to mount an immune response; when a person is exposed–eg, to 'dirty' wounds, or plans potential exposure–eg, travel to regions endemic for certain infectious agents, the BS provides a rapid anamnestic response that outpaces the development of disease–eg, tetanus
References in periodicals archive ?
Philosophy Booster Shots costs pounds 38 from Selfridges, Harvey Nichols and Sephora at Merry Hill.
Time-released vaccines (pills or sprays designed to release vaccines slowly) may soon eliminate the need for booster shots.
Sickly both in December and all of 2001, compared with same periods a year earlier, the Retail ROP Index did get booster shots administered by the Drug Stores category during the same time frames.
As a safeguard youngsters in the Rhondda Taff Ely area will receive booster shots against the disease.
In Spite of Your Doctor about tetanus "booster" shots, "Today, I question whether booster shots are ever needed and even whether the administration of tetanus antitoxin makes any sense.
Research has not yet determined when booster shots need to be scheduled, but it is likely that they will be needed.
Zuniga says that a live-virus vaccine would have the benefit of lifetime immunity without the need for booster shots.
But company officials stress that it is still too early to determine the effectiveness of the vaccine, the possibility of long-term side effects and whether or not booster shots will be required.
After that, monthly booster shots are necessary, all yearround, for about five to eight years.
Howard Weiner of Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston presented data showing that booster shots of intravenous Cytoxan, given every two months over two years after the initial Cytoxan treatment, allowed a subgroup of patients to become more stable than those who received no boosters.
By late 1984, the vaccine had become so scarce that 18-month and preschool booster shots had to be postponed for many children, and the price of the vaccine had tripled.
For any vaccines or booster shots you receive, be sure to keep a written record for future reference.