Book


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Böök

(buk),
Jan A., 20th-century Swedish geneticist. See: Böök syndrome.
References in classic literature ?
An old book that," said the curate, "but I find no reason for clemency in it; send it after the others without appeal;" which was done.
Though he asked no one about it, reluctantly and with feigned indifference answered his friends' inquiries as to how the book was going, and did not even inquire of the booksellers how the book was selling, Sergey Ivanovitch was all on the alert, with strained attention, watching for the first impression his book would make in the world and in literature.
And to think my book is to be writ by the schoolmaster's grandson
On the upper shelf there appeared, in solitary grandeur, one object only--a gorgeously bound book.
I was widening my knowledge of it helplessly and involuntarily, and I was always chancing upon some book that served this end among the great number of books that I read merely for my pleasure without any real result of the sort.
In the dim, far-off times when our forefathers were wild, naked savages, they had no books.
Tom took his whipping and went back to his seat not at all broken-hearted, for he thought it was possible that he had unknowingly upset the ink on the spelling- book himself, in some skylarking bout -- he had denied it for form's sake and because it was custom, and had stuck to the denial from principle.
There is, indeed, no such short cut to knowledge of each other as a talk about books.
He forbids me to see any strangers; and he orders me, if I read at all, only to read the lightest and the most amusing books.
Jones, on the contrary, whose character was on the outside of generosity, and may perhaps not very unjustly have been suspected of extravagance, without any hesitation gave a guinea in exchange for the book.
The 'Whale' is only half through the press; for, wearied with the long delays of the printers, and disgusted with the heat and dust of the Babylonish brick-kiln of New York, I came back to the country to feel the grass, and end the book reclining on it, if I may.
So, I made a rush towards the bookcase nearest me, and, without stopping further to consider matters, seized hold of the first dusty tome upon which my hands chanced to alight, and, reddening and growing pale by turns, and trembling with fear and excitement, clasped the stolen book to my breast with the intention of reading it by candle light while my mother lay asleep at night.