bone tumor

(redirected from Bone neoplasms)

bone tumor

Oncology A generic term encompassing both malignant and benign tumors in bone; most cancer in bone tissue is 2º to metastasis from a distant 1ºs–eg, from breast or prostate; 1º bone CA–eg, osteogenic sarcoma is rare. See Osteoma, Osteosarcoma.
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It accounts for about 2.5% of all bone tumors and 7.5% of the benign bone neoplasms. The lesion has mainly two forms; monostotic form defines single bone involvement and polyostotic form defines multiple bone involvement.
IH is rare and accounts for < 1% of all bone neoplasms. It can affect any age group, particularly those 40-50 years old.
Primary bone neoplasms in domestic cats are rare and only represent 4.9% of all tumors diagnosed in this species (ROSA & KIRBERGER, 2012).
[31] reported that the formation of bone neoplasms depended on the duration and doses of the treatment and occurred in rats treated for 20 or 24 months.
Primary bone neoplasms, both benign and malignant, should remain in the differential diagnosis of petrous apex lesions.
INTRODUCTION: Gaint cell tumors are relatively common primary bone tumors, and represent 4-5% of all primary bone neoplasms. They are locally aggressive lesions and tend to metastasize.
Hypercalcemia (elevated calcium in the blood) is also noted in a variety of conditions such as hyperparathyroidism, hypervitaminosis D, bone neoplasms, milk-alkali syndrome (seen in patients who ingest large amounts of milk or alkali for relief of gastric acidity associated with peptic ulcer disease), sarcoidosis, thyrotoxicosis, multiple myeloma, and polycythemia rubra vera.
(2,10) The differential diagnosis includes both benign and malignant osteolytic neoplasms such as metastasis, primary bone neoplasms, hemangioma, aneurysmal bone cyst, eosinophilic granuloma, fibrosarcoma, epidermoid cyst, and bone infection.
Symptoms of MM are the result of bone marrow infiltration, the development of bone neoplasms, and the effects of the disease process on the renal system.
This case illustrates the difficulties that can occur when relying on a singular diagnostic modality, particularly when dealing with benign bone neoplasms. Osteoma is a rare diagnosis in humans and animals but should be considered by the clinician when presented with a bony lesion.
Two of the articles review bone neoplasms, one describing the gamut of bone tumors with epithelial differentiation or epithelioid morphology and the other describing the spectrum of small, round cell neoplasms.
DISCUSSION: Osteoblastoma is a rare benign tumor that accounts for less than 1% of all primary bone neoplasms. The neoplasm may be intramedullary, cortical, or sub periosteal in location.