bomb

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bomb

Computers
An abnormal termination of a program being executed, which requires that the computer be rebooted.
 
Drug slang
A regional street term for a large quantity of various drugs of abuse—e.g., crack, heroin, or a large marijuana cigarette.
 
Military noun
A device designed to cause physical damage to a specified area, by exploding on impact or when a particular event occurs—e.g., being moved, or on a timer.

verb To attack an opponent with (aerial) bombs.
 
Popular psychology
See Time bomb.

Radiation oncology
A container formerly used to store radioactive materials (e.g., radium) for future use in radiotherapy.

Vox populi
The significance of the word bomb may depend on whether the speaker uses the indefinite article—e.g., “a bomb”, which means that the subject matter is awful— or the definite article—e.g., “the bomb”, which means that the subject matter is cool, fashionable or exciting.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

bomb

Military medicine A device designed to cause physical damage to a specified area, by exploding on impact or when a particular event occurs–eg, being moved. See B-61, Dirty bomb, Genetic bomb Popular psychology See Time bomb.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

bomb

A radioactive source held in a container for the purpose of RADIOTHERAPY.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
"As a result of the collateral damage and international condemnation, and ahead of a potential new conflict with Hizbollah, the IDF has decided to evaluate the M85 bomblet manufactured by the government-owned Israeli Military Industries (IMI)," The Jerusalem Post reported.
It is thought that around 30 per cent of bomblets failed to explode on impact, and over two-thirds of the country is still contaminated.
AoAs a result of the collateral damage and international condemnation, and ahead of a potential new conflict with Hizbullah, the IDF has decided to evaluate the M85 bomblet manufactured by the government-owned Israeli Military Industries (IMI),Ao The Jerusalem Post reported.
That's small comfort to small children or farmers who have lost their legs after an encounter with a cluster bomblet.
Japan should also announce plans to contribute to removing unexploded bomblets and aid victims of cluster munitions.
Unfortunately, a small percentage of these bomblets routinely do not explode, remaining a menace to small children and farm animals for decades.
If someone designed a cluster bomb whose bomblets all exploded reliably on impact, or at least within 48 hours of landing, then it would presumably be legal since it mostly killed soldiers.
Campaigners have condemned the weapons for putting civilians in danger when scattered "bomblets" fail to explode.
By Richard Boudreaux OCCUPIED JERUSALEM--In a rare internal critique of Israel's use of cluster bombs, a government-appointed commission has found a lack of "operational discipline, control and oversight" in the army's deployment of the weapon in civilian areas.The panel's statement, buried in an exhaustive report on Israel's conduct of the 2006 Lebanon war, did not directly challenge the army's assertion that its use of cluster bombs in that conflict fell within the bounds of international humanitarian law.But the five-member panel raised questions about the army's use of the weapon against Hezbollah guerrillas in Lebanese villages from which civilians had fled but to which they eventually would return.Cluster bombs spray deadly bomblets over a wide area.
(1) But in conflicts where cluster bombs are utilized and when the battles have ended, unexploded cluster bomblets inevitably remain, sometimes wounding and killing innocent people when they return to their homes.
Once dropped, the munitions scatter hundreds of bomblets randomly over a wide area, many of which fail to explode and linger on as de facto landmines.
Cluster bombs are designed to disperse hundreds of smaller "bomblets" over a wide area.