failure

(redirected from Bomb (movie))
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

failure

 [fāl´yer]
inability to perform or to function properly.
adult failure to thrive a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as a progressive functional deterioration of a physical and cognitive nature. The individual's ability to live with multisystem diseases, cope with ensuing problems, and manage his/her care are remarkably diminished.
bone marrow failure failure of the hematopoietic function of the bone marrow; see also bone marrow suppression.
congestive heart failure see congestive heart failure.
heart failure see heart failure.
kidney failure renal failure.
multiple organ failure failure of two or more organ systems in a critically ill patient; see also multiple organ failure.
renal failure see renal failure.
respiratory failure see respiratory failure.
failure to thrive (failure to thrive syndrome) physical and developmental retardation in infants and small children. The syndrome can be seen in children with a physical illness, but the term is most often taken to mean failure to thrive due to psychosocial effects such as maternal deprivation. The syndrome was first noticed when European psychiatrists studied the development of babies who had spent the first five years of their lives in institutions where they were deprived of the emotional warmth of a mother, father, or other primary caregiver.

Characteristics of the failure to thrive syndrome include lack of physical growth (for example, weight and height below the third percentile for age) and below normal achievement in fine and gross motor, social-adaptive, and language skills as assessed by psychometric testing using a tool such as the Denver Developmental Screening Test. Additionally, the child with this syndrome displays withdrawing behavior, avoidance of eye contact, and stiffness or flaccid posture when held. These children often have a history of irritability, feeding problems, and disturbed sleep patterns.

Parents of infants with failure to thrive syndrome typically display feelings of concern and inadequacy. The infant who is feeding poorly and is irritable may elicit a response in the caregiver that reflects tension and frustration. The need for comfort and nurturing by the infant may not be met, and this may lead to a cycle that exacerbates feeding problems.

Intervention encompasses identification of infants and mothers at risk for the syndrome and care of both mother or primary caregiver and infant. The major goals are to encourage the mother to express her feelings without fear of rejection, to model the role of mother and teach her nurturing behaviors, and to promote her self-esteem and confidence. Important nursing goals in the care of the infant include providing optimal nutrition, comfort, and rest; meeting the infant's psychosocial needs; and supplying emotional nurturance and sensory stimulation appropriate to the assessed developmental level.
ventilatory failure respiratory failure.

fail·ure

(fāl'yūr),
The state of insufficiency or nonperformance.

failure

Vox populi A nonfunctioning state. See Acute renal failure, Acute skin failure, Atrial systolic failure, Autonomic failure, Backward failure, Baroreflex failure, Chronic renal failure, Decompensated low-output backward failure, Defibrillation failure, Failure to thrive, Forward failure, Fulminant hepatic failure, Graft failure, High-output heart failure, Induction failure, Intrinsic renal failure, Left ventricular failure, Low-output heart failure, Mean time between failure, Medical failure, Multisystem organ failure, Postpartum renal failure, Premature ovarian failure, Right ventricular failure, Zidovudine failure.

fail·ure

(fāl'yŭr)
The state of insufficiency or nonperformance; describes dysfunction of body systems or organs (e.g., renal failure).

fail·ure

(fāl'yŭr)
State of insufficiency or nonperformance.

Patient discussion about failure

Q. What Is the Treatment for Congestive Heart Failure? My mother is 76 years ols and has been suffering from a heart disease for many years. Lately she has developed congestive heart failure. How is this situation treated?

A. In addition to everything else, she might try CoQ10, a supplement available at most nutrition stores.

"Congestive heart failure has been strongly correlated with significantly low blood and tissue levels of CoQ10 ....

[In numerous studies] treatment with CoQ10 significantly improved heart muscle function while producing no adverse effects or drug interactions."

http://faculty.washington.edu/ely/coenzq10.html

Q. congestive heart failure how it works is it to do with fluid built up in your body

A. Congestive heart failure (CHF), or heart failure, is a condition in which the heart can't pump enough blood to the body's other organs. The "failing" heart keeps working but not as efficiently as it should. People with heart failure can't exert themselves because they become short of breath and tired.
As blood flow out of the heart slows, blood returning to the heart through the veins backs up, causing congestion in the tissues. Often swelling (edema) results. Most often there's swelling in the legs and ankles, but it can happen in other parts of the body, too. Sometimes fluid collects in the lungs and interferes with breathing, causing shortness of breath, especially when a person is lying down.
Heart failure also affects the kidneys' ability to dispose of sodium and water. The retained water increases the edema.

Q. describe the symptoms of congestive heart failure

A. From my own expierience, EM24 gave an accurate answer. My edema also affects my hands as well as ankles. I was given a Xopenex HFA inhaler to use if lungs are affected.

More discussions about failure