Boerhaave syndrome

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Boer·haa·ve syn·drome

(būr'hah-vē),
rupture of the esophagus caused by increased intraluminal pressure and distention during retching or vomiting; results in mediastinitis. The rupture most often occurs in the left pleural space.

Boerhaave syndrome

A clinical emergency consisting of a transmural laceration of the lower oesophagus that occurs spontaneously during retching, which in turn may be related to excess alcohol consumption, or secondary due to reflux oesophagitis, endoscopy, CPR, trauma, vagotomy or presence of a foreign body. It is more common in patients with pre-existing oesophageal disease—e.g., reflux oesophagitis.
 
Clinical findings
Abrupt chest pain, which may radiate to the neck, accompanied by shock, sepsis and death within 48 hours if untreated; 70% survival has been reported if diagnosed and treated early.

Boerhaave syndrome

Traumatic rupture of the lower esophagus after major blunt chest trauma, CPR or forceful protracted vomiting; BS is more common in Pts with pre-existing esophageal disease–eg, reflux esophagitis Clinical Abrupt chest pain, which may radiate to the neck, accompanied by shock, sepsis, death within 48 hrs if untreated

Boer·haa·ve syn·drome

(būr'hah-vē sin'drōm)
Spontaneous rupture of the lower esophagus, a variant of Mallory-Weiss syndrome.

Boerhaave,

Hermann, Dutch physician, 1668-1738.
Boerhaave glands - Synonym(s): sweat glands
Boerhaave syndrome - spontaneous rupture of the lower esophagus, a variant of Mallory-Weiss syndrome.
References in periodicals archive ?
This description of catalepsy was first adopted in 1722 by Boerhave in Aphorismi, but afterwards it was associated with delirium and somnambulism by Hughlings Jackson.
Generalmente se situan los antecedentes historicos de la moderna industria farmaceutica, entendida como fabricacion masiva de medicamentos, en la iatroquimica del siglo XVII de Franz de la Boe y Willis y en la iatromecanica de Boerhave que tuvieron gran exito en la medicina que media entre los siglos XVII y XVIII.