body of mandible

(redirected from Body of the mandible)

bod·y of man·di·ble

[TA]
the heavy, U-shaped, horizontal portion of the mandible extending posteriorly to the angle where it is continuous with the ramus; it supports the lower teeth.
Synonym(s): corpus mandibulae [TA]

bod·y of man·di·ble

(bodē mandi-bĕl) [TA]
The heavy, U-shaped horizontal portion of the mandible extending posteriorly to the ramus; it supports the lower teeth
Synonym(s): corpus mandibulae [TA] .

bod·y of man·di·ble

(bodē mandi-bĕl) [TA]
Heavy, U-shaped, horizontal portion of the mandible extending posteriorly to the angle where it is continuous with the ramus; supports lower teeth.
References in periodicals archive ?
The axial section CT image of mandible showed expansion of the body of the mandible with few lytic areas bilaterally but greater in degree on the left side and expansion of the left ramus.
[26] The body of the mandible was the most common mandibular fracture site.
A 19-year-old man presented with numerous asymptomatic intramandibular radiolucencies in the ramus and body of the mandible found during routine panoramic radiography.
Panoramic radiographic examination revealed a unilocular radiolucent lesion extending from the body of the mandible through to the angle and right ascending ramus, causing displacement of the second molar towards the base of the mandible and the third molar towards the ascending ramus (Figure 2).
Biopsy of the lesion showed squamous cell carcinoma of the internal surface of the posterior third of the body of the mandible, clinically staged as T3N2bM0 after cranial and cervical MRI (Figures 1 and 2) and thoracic CT.
It is often seen as recurrent mandibular osteitis demonstrating bone sclerosis, mainly involving the body of the mandible [3].
OPG and X-Ray of left mandible showed tumor involving body of the mandible. It was multicystic, radiolucent tumor involving outer and inner table of body of the mandible.
Caption: FIGURE 2: Orthopantomogram reveals radiopaque lesion surrounded by a radiolucent zone extending anteriorly from the lower first molar region to body of the mandible posteriorly on the right side.
Panoramic radiograph was performed to show a well delimited unilocular radiolucency located in the left body of the mandible, extending distally from the tooth 35 to the ramus of the mandible (Fig.
According to a meta - analysis, 63 cases were reported from 1927-2003, the various sites of the mandible in relation with frequency in the descending manner shows 30.5% lesions in the posterior body of the mandible, 28.5% in the condyle, 14.2% in the angle, 11.1% in the ascending ramus, 7.9% in the coronoid process, 6.3% in the anterior body and 1.5% in the sigmoid notch.1 There are no reports of Osteomas undergoing malignant transformation.
On examination, there were two fixed, nontender masses of firm consistency and smooth surface; one was located in the inferior surface of the right side of the body of the mandible and the other at the left ramus of the mandible.