body cavity

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bod·y cav·i·ty

the collective visceral cavity of the trunk (thoracic cavity plus abdominopelvic cavity), bounded by the superior thoracic aperture above, the pelvic floor below, and the body walls (parietes) in between.
Synonym(s): celom (2) , celoma, coelom (1)
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

body cavity

n.
1. See coelom.
2. Any of the cavities of the body that adjoin external orifices, such as the mouth or rectum.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

body cavity

Any space in the body that does not freely communicate with the outside. Body cavities are covered with specialised lining cells—e.g., mesothelial cells in the pericardium, peritoneum and pleura.

Body cavity types
• Major—Pericardial, pleural, peritoneal, cerebrospinal. 
• Minor—Amniotic, anterior chamber of the eye, cul de sac, hydrocele, oral cavity, synovial, vitreous.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

bod·y cav·i·ty

(bod'ē kav'i-tē)
The collective visceral cavity of the trunk (thoracic cavity plus abdominopelvic cavity), bounded by the superior thoracic aperture above, the pelvic floor below, and the body walls (parietes) in between.
Synonym(s): celom (2) , celoma.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
Enlarge picture
CAVITIES OF THE BODY

body cavity

Enlarge picture
CAVITIES OF THE BODY
1. Any hollow space within the body. See: illustration
2. A hidden body space that is accessible from the outside, e.g., rectum or vagina. Referred to in “body cavity search for contraband”.
3. Derivatives of the coelom, i.e., the pericardial, peritoneal, and plural sacs. See: coelom
See also: cavity
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

body cavity

the space within the body of most animals in which the gut and various organs are suspended. It normally contains fluid and is derived embryologically in different ways in different groups of animals. Absent in PLATYHELMINTHS and NEMERTINE worms, it is derived from the COELOM in vertebrates and from the HAEMOCOEL in arthropods and molluscs. It occurs as an intercellular space in nematode worms.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Most of the body cavities are protected by the skeletal framework that helps to protect the major organs that are housed inside each of them.
Banned items, stuffed into inmates' body cavities, are often smuggled back to cells.
It can pinpoint the exact location of the metallic object that a person is carrying, even when hidden in body cavities. It also offers uniform detection throughout the archway and superior immunity to false alarms caused by interference and vibration.
The two-part polyurethane foam is injected into body cavities during vehicle assembly, where it cures almost immediately.
The larger frog was extremely edematous, with clear gelatinous fluid in the subcutaneous tissues and body cavities. In hematoxylin- and eosin-stained 4-[micro]m sections of liver from the larger frog, there was moderate to severe lymphohistiocytic hepatitis with individual hepatocyte necrosis, fibrosis, and numerous granular basophilic bodies resembling bacteria within hepatocytes and histiocytes.
Development of specific body systems is then covered chapter by chapter, addressing the skin, musculoskeletal system, central and peripheral nervous systems, respiratory system and body cavities, heart, vasculature, GI tract, urinary system, reproductive system, pharynx and face, ears, eyes, and limbs.
London's Heathrow Airport has been put on high alert following credible bomb threats in the form of female suicide bombers with bombs planted on their breast implants and body cavities.
You need a much more intrusive type of X-ray machine that can actually see inside body cavities," the paper quoted terror expert Steve Emerson, as saying.
When inmates sit down, their body cavities are immediately scanned in a "non-intrusive manner".
A source said: "It's unbelievable some of the things inmates are smuggling in their body cavities.
Major topics include cells and tissues, skin, muscles and bones, body cavities, linings, nervous and endocrine systems, the brain, the spinal cord, neural pathways, language and memory, hormones, the senses, the respiratory and cardiovascular systems, the lymph nodes, digestion, the urinary system, the liver, reproductive systems, and genetics.