body language


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language

 [lang´gwij]
1. the use of a meaningful pattern of vocal sounds (or corresponding written symbols) to convey thoughts and feelings, or a system of such patterns that is understood by a group of people.
2. by extension, any of various other systems of communication that use sets of discrete symbols.
3. any of numerous sets of standardized vocabulary terms for use among health care providers in a variety of settings allowing comparisons of care across populations, settings, regions, and time. There are over 30 researched standardized health care languages. Called also standardized vocabulary.
body language the expression of thoughts or emotions by means of posture or gesture.
International Sign language a sign language composed of a blending of vocabulary signs from numerous different countries, sometimes used at international meetings and events of deaf persons; formerly called Gestuno.
natural language ordinary language as used by the speakers of that language, as opposed to a language made up for a special purpose (as for use by a computer system).
nursing language any of various sets of standardized terms and definitions for use in nursing to provide standardized descriptions, labels, and definitions for expressing the phenomena of nursing; some include category groupings of terms. The American Nurses Association has recognized twelve official languages.

bod·y lan·guage

1. the expression of thoughts and feelings by means of nonverbal bodily movements, for example, gestures, or via the symptoms of hysterical conversion;
2. communication by means of bodily signs.

body language

n.
The gestures, postures, and facial expressions by which a person manifests various physical, mental, or emotional states and communicates nonverbally with others.
An informal, often culture-independent form of communication in which emotions, feelings, motives, and thoughts are expressed by changes in facial expressions, gestures, posture, body positions, and other nonverbal signs

body language

Psychology An informal often culture-independent form of communication in which emotions, feelings, motives, and thoughts are expressed by changes in facial expressions, gestures, posture, body positions, and other nonverbal signs. See Kinesics.

bod·y lan·guage

(bod'ē lang'gwăj)
A form of communication using body movements or gestures instead of or in addition to speech or other forms of communication.

body language

The communication of information, usually of a personal nature, without the medium of speech, writing or other agreed codes. Body language involves a range of subtle or obvious physical attitudes, expressions, gestures and relative positions. It can, and often does, eloquently reflect current states of mind and attitudes towards others, whether positive or negative. Body language is often at variance with explicit verbal statement and in such cases is often the more reliable indicator.
References in periodicals archive ?
The author will be presenting "Reading the Tells: Learning How to Read Body Language" at VISION 2013.
One of the attributes of leadership is being able to show self-control and situation-control through body language and speech.
You can also fake body language, he says, but it depends on how good an actor you are on how long you can pull it off.
Teachers during the lectures use oral or written language as well as body language to transfer information.
Establish a rapport to put them at ease, and then observe their body language. Then you will be able to spot changes in their behavior that signal when you are in trouble and need to change your approach.
Robert has been the resident body language expert on The Trisha Goddard Show for more than seven years with over 100 shows.
So, is there someone out there who knows about body language in a wheelchair?
But when it came to naming an overall debating champion, Robert Phipps, a body language expert, said there wasn't a clear winner.
Regardless of the leadership role we assume in life (whether as a spouse, parent, law enforcement professional, or friend and colleague), it is imperative that we read and recognize the nonverbal body language of those with whom we interact.
Formulating those answers usually gets in the way of listening, observing body language and understanding what someone else is saying.
The latest research on opinions and nonverbal communication skills are examined in a fine survey for coaches, business leaders and workers alike, with chapters telling how to understand and speak body language to take advantage of workplace atmosphere.
Of course, the body language provides the controlling metaphor for preaching on this occasion.