bloodborne pathogen

(redirected from Blood-borne disease)
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bloodborne pathogen

A pathogen present in blood that can be transmitted to an individual who is exposed to the blood or body fluids of an infected individual. Three common bloodborne pathogens are hepatitis C, hepatitis B, and human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1).
hepatitis B; human immunodeficiency virus;
See also: pathogen
References in periodicals archive ?
The campaign lasted between October 2018 and April this year, and had screened 45 million citizens for the blood-borne disease, according to the ministry.
Earlier, speaking on the occasion Special Assistant to Prime Minister on Health Dr Zafar Mirza said that the government will announce a comprehensive package enabling to deal with blood-borne disease including hepatitis.
'In order for us to eliminate hepatitis C, we urge Malaysians to come to this specially designed screening sites to get tested and treated for this blood-borne disease,' he said.
Zika is blood-borne disease which is transmitted through mosquito bites so it is not contagious person to person.
This is the case with the West Nile virus, a blood-borne disease carried by mosquitoes that commonly affects crows and jays, that can also affect horses and threaten human health.
The new drugs, if approved, could offer a quicker, more effective approach to eliminating hepatitis C, a blood-borne disease blamed for 15,000 deaths in the U.S.
The blood supply today is extremely safe, with the risk of catching a blood-borne disease via a transfusion miniscule.
The blood-borne disease was discovered during a routine examination, the US star's spokesman said.
A spokeswoman for the Health Ministry said the practice of discarding blood from Ethiopian donors stemmed from international guidelines restricting the use of blood from people who have spent significant amounts of time in countries in which there is a high risk of blood-borne disease. The spokeswoman, Inbal Jacobs, cited the example of discarding blood from donors who had spent time in Britain during the outbreak of Mad Cow disease.
Recently, the Red Cross formally apologized for the tainted blood scandal, was fined $5,000, is to contribute $1.5 million for research into blood-borne disease, and must provide scholarships to victims or family members.
Hepatitis C is a highly infectious blood-borne disease that causes liver cirrhosis, liver cancer, fatigue and chest and stomach pain.
This blood-borne disease has only been widely recognized within the last 10 to 15 years, and the worldwide epidemic is staggering.