blood transfusion

(redirected from Blood transfusions)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

blood transfusion

Etymology: AS, blod + L transfundere, to pour through
the administration of whole blood or a component, such as packed red cells, to replace blood lost through trauma, surgery, or disease.
method Needed equipment is gathered; physician order is reviewed; transfusion consent is completed; and blood component is obtained, verified, and inspected per institution protocol. It is extremely important that the blood component to be transfused is compatible with the individual receiving the transfusion and that the correct individual is receiving the transfusion. Once verification of product and individual is confirmed, the blood component is hung using the appropriate tubing and setup and infused. A piggybacked 0.9% normal saline solution is set up to follow the infusion or to flush the line in event of a transfusion reaction. Infusion must be completed in under 4 hours to prevent bacterial growth. Individuals must be carefully monitored for a transfusion reaction during infusion. Vital signs should be checked every 5 minutes along with checks for signs and symptoms such as fever, facial flushing, rapid thready pulse, cold clammy skin, itching, swelling at infusion site, dizziness, dyspnea, and low back or chest pain. (Stop infusion immediately at any sign of transfusion reaction.) After infusion, IV tubing is cleared with saline solution and the blood bag discarded according to institution policy.
outcome criteria No signs of transfusion reaction. (See transfusion reaction for appropriate interventions if reaction occurs.) Laboratory values show positive response to administration of blood component.
enlarge picture
Setup for blood administration

blood transfusion

The administration of blood—usually understood to mean a transfusion of packed red cells—to a recipient, to replace red cells or blood products lost due to severe bleeding.

blood transfusion

The transfer of blood or blood products from a donor into a recipient, usually to replace red cells or blood products lost through severe bleeding. See Autologous transfusion, Blood conserving therapy, Directed donation.

blood transfusion

The administration of blood, by instillation into a vein, to replace blood lost or to treat a failure of blood production. Before transfusion, the blood group of the recipient must be known and serum from the blood to be transfused is cross-matched with the recipient's blood cells to confirm compatibility. Sometimes the patient's own blood, collected at operation or obtained earlier, is used.

blood transfusion,

n the administration of whole blood or a component such as packed red cells to replace blood lost through trauma, surgery, or disease.

blood transfusion


blood transfusion transfusion reaction
see transfusion reaction.
References in periodicals archive ?
Table 1: Details of dogs suffering from various diseases and enrolled for blood transfusion S.
Protestant countries, such as England, which had shrugged off the power of the Catholic Church, were especially interested in scientific change like blood transfusion that might challenge Church authority.
The demand for blood transfusion perioperatively has contributed towards the strain on blood banks to meet requirements (Tellisi et al 2006).
One of the major problems, however - the iron overload in the body caused by the repeated blood transfusions -- still the remains the main cause for thalassaemia deaths.
Anita Baxter, aged 56, from Naas, in Co Kildare, suffered significant blood loss after having a tumour removed and died because she refused a blood transfusion.
Ademokum et al (6) assert that at least 40% of unnecessary hospital admissions are for blood transfusions, and state that day services could be improved to enable patients to receive transfusions at home and to avoid unnecessary emergency hospital admissions in the last days of life.
If we assume no further spread through blood transfusions after 10 years of infections by the alimentary route, the maximum prevalence reached is [approximately equal to] 1,860 (1,434 for nonrecipients plus 426 for recipients) because some of the infected persons die of other causes during the incubation period.
A total of 2401 patients (10%) underwent at least 1 blood transfusion during their hospitalization.
Q: Should people avoid getting blood transfusions or organ transplants?
Even though Deny is given credit for the first blood transfusion, it is a well-known fact that the Incas practised successful blood transfusions much earlier than European doctors.
The primary endpoint of the study will be the avoidance of donor blood transfusions.
Administration is now telling us we have to do our own since we cannot bill separately for blood transfusions.