artificial blood

(redirected from Blood substitutes)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

artificial blood

Artificial oxygen carrier Transfusion medicine A synthetic or semisynthetic substance used to transport O2; usually a blood loss of 20-25% is well tolerated and crystalloids–eg, dextrose, are adequate to raise the blood volume to acceptable levels
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
WiseGuyReports.com adds "Artificial Blood Substitutes Market 2019 Global Analysis, Growth, Trends and Opportunities Research Report Forecasting to 2024" reports to its database.
The blood substitute can prove to be a boon for many patients who face the problem of unavailability of blood in emergency situations.
Reid: "Investment in blood substitutes: Worth the effort?" Brown University.2012: http://biomed.brown.edu/Courses/BI108/BI108_2005_Groups/10/webpages/opinionslink .ht m#opinkim.
This data driven report contains over 20 links to online copies of actual blood substitutes deals and contract documents as submitted to the Securities Exchange Commission by companies and their partners, where available.
Thus, the clinical introduction of perfluorocarbon-based blood substitutes is rather difficult nowadays.
Although he has since secured several patents in blood substitutes and artificial cells, separate challenges confront inventors of emerging technologies in interdisciplinary research.
A "NO-CONSENT" MEDICAL STUDY of an experimental blood substitute is creating an uproar among researchers and bioethicists.
Teams are only allowed to use a maximum of 20 players including blood substitutes.
The first generation of perfluorocarbons used as blood substitutes in mice during the 1960s had a major drawback -- poorly eliminated by the organism, they accumulated in the tissues of the body.
The first generation of perfluorocarbons used as blood substitutes in mice during the l960s had a major drawback -- poorly eliminated by the organism, they accumulated in the tissues of the body.
The other problem with fluorocarbon-based blood substitutes is that they only work for about six hours, which is fine for a patient who needs extra blood quickly for an operation, but not for a patient who needs a transfusion to counteract a long-term condition like anemia.
Researchers at the School of Medicine also are testing promising new blood substitutes that carry oxygen just like red blood cells.