sacrifice

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sacrifice

(sak′rĭ-fīs″) [L. sacrificare, to make or offer a sacrifice]
1. To give up or yield something of value.
2. To experience a loss.
References in periodicals archive ?
Seediq translator Kuo Ming-Cheng/Dakis Pawan has told us that "blood sacrifice for ancestors" and "pride" were not part of Seediq culture.
We contend that the Semai beliefs concerning thunder, taboos, and blood sacrifice are part of a cultural world view and are not rigid and unchanging.
However, before Michael arrives at that moment in his narrative when he presents the crucifixion as an effective atonement for humanity, he lays the groundwork for the requirement of blood sacrifice for expiation of sin, a groundwork in turn founded on the discourse of atonement articulated in the council in Heaven.
What about the offensiveness of blood sacrifice (memorialized at communion) in connection with modern Western culture?
Pausanias' interest in such cults was not restricted to Delphi, as he describes the sacrificial rituals at about fifty other centres in Greece, in which the blood sacrifice of animals was maintained in opposition to the rejection of such offerings by Christians.
Their numerous independent city-states shared similar practices and beliefs, among them worshipping powerful gods through blood sacrifice, the study of astronomy, and building magnificent temples, palaces, and monuments.
It knows only a final blood sacrifice. It does not see that Jesus taught a nonviolent way of life and settled conflicts in a nonviolent manner.
* Jesus died to offer the kind of pure blood sacrifice that God demanded, to persuade God not to be angry with the world.
While tracing its doubly-conscious protagonist's return to her birth village--Ayane returns to the fictional Mboasu to attend to her dying mother--this complex debut novel allegorizes the rise of a power-hungry leader who wields blood sacrifice to force unity by submission.
"The scale and sheer complexity of the blood sacrifice of children at Cerro Cerrillos appears to be something completely new," New Scientist quoted Haagen Klaus of Utah Valley University in Orem as saying.
Is not every criminal case a battle of good versus evil, with a possible death sentence as the blood sacrifice? It even describes medicine, where physicians and nurses, decked out in blue or green scrub suits, fight the evils of disease and injury.
Both were without blood sacrifice, though neither abandoned the idea of bloody sacrifice and the attendant prospect of violence.