bleeding

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bleeding

 [blēd´ing]
1. escape of blood from an injured vessel; see also hemorrhage.
2. phlebotomy.
dysfunctional uterine bleeding bleeding from the nonmenstruating uterus when no organic lesions are present.
implantation bleeding that occurring at the time of implantation of the zygote in the decidua.
occult bleeding escape of blood in such small quantity that it can be detected only by chemical tests or by microscopic or spectroscopic examination.
bleeding time the time required for a standardized wound to stop bleeding. The bleeding time test is used as a screening procedure to detect both congenital and acquired platelet disorders; it measures the ability of platelets to arrest bleeding and hence gives an estimate of platelet number and level of functioning. There are several methods of performing the bleeding time. In Ivy's test, incisions are made on the forearm, a sphygmomanometer is inflated to a standard of 40 mm around the upper arm, and the time until cessation of bleeding is recorded. The template method is a variation in which a template with a slit in it is laid on the forearm, and the slit and the knife making the skin incision are both standardized. The most widely used template is the Simplate. Normally bleeding will cease in 2 to 9 minutes. Qualitative platelet disorders, thrombocytopenia (platelet count of less than 100,000/mm3), and the use of aspirin will prolong the bleeding time.

bleed·ing

(blēd'ing),
1. Losing blood as a result of the rupture or severance of blood vessels.
2. Phlebotomy; the letting of blood.

bleeding

Cosmetic surgery
A popular term for exudation of gel silicone through an implant—e.g., breast capsule into surrounding tissue.

Medspeak
Emitting blood; haemorrhage; bloodletting.
 
Vox populi
Hemorrhagic diathesis, see there; expressing anguish.

bleeding

Clinical medicine Emitting blood; hemorrhaging; bloodletting Gynecology See Breakthrough bleeding, Dysfunctional uterine bleeding, Postmenopausal bleeding, Postpartum bleeding, Varicial bleeding Medtalk Hemorrhagic diathesis, see there; expressing anguish or compassion.

bleed·ing

(blēd'ing)
1. Losing blood as a result of the rupture or severance of blood vessels.
2. Phlebotomy; the letting of blood.

bleeding

Haemorrhage.

bleed·ing

(blēd'ing)
Losing blood as a result of the rupture or severance of blood vessels.

Patient discussion about bleeding

Q. Hi, I´m bleeding when I pee,suggestions? I´m 42 years old,and I had a lot of pain days ago just like before when I had a kidney stone and now I´m bleeding when I pee but I don´t know if could be a different problem

A. Thanks everybody, I´m taking care of the problem, all of you are very nice, God bless you.

Q. Can acupuncture cause bleeding? I’m thinking to try acupuncture for back pain I have for many months (long story, so far nothing helped), but I’m afraid it’ll cause bruises and bleeding – last week when the nurse draw blood from my arm she left a green sign that lasted almost a week. Is it dangerous? Can it cause infection?

A. Has blood drawing ever caused an infection? The same way, if the new and sterile needles are used, the risk is very low.

Take care

Q. My husband has a very small mole that was cut.We can not seem to get it to stop bleeding. Any suggestions? tried a shaving pencil, and band-aids of every size. Just will not stop bleeding.

A. In this case, you should go see the doctor who took the mole out, or any dermatologist actually, that can burn the spot a little bit to help it stop bleeding.

More discussions about bleeding
References in periodicals archive ?
CD for placenta previa is associated with an increased risk of postpartum hemorrhage, with bleeding from the lower uterine segment greatly contributing to total blood loss. While O'Leary sutures can stem the flow of bleeding in this area, the use of both an intrauterine balloon tamponade plus uterine compression sutures--a so-called uterine sandwich--may result in maximal reduction in blood loss.
Table-II: Significant effects of confounding variable of Maternal Age on outcomes of (A) Blood loss (B) Pain, and (C) Need for surgical intervention as depicted by p-values of chi square and exact tests.
Thus, the current study was planned to determine if the use of TXA reduces perioperative blood loss and need for allogenic blood transfusion in patients undergoing TKA, to compare the effectiveness of intra-articularly administered TXA and adrenaline on perioperative blood loss, and evaluate the rate of complications, including the rate of thromboembolic events, in patients receiving TXA and adrenaline.
Although the amount of blood loss has been shown to have been reduced with prophylactic use of misoprostol in many studies, it is not as effective as oxytocin.
Reduction of blood loss and transfusions in surgical interventions in general and spinal surgery in particular is important in order to minimize its associated risks of infectious transmission, reduction of immunity, surgical site infection, clotting mechanism failure, and acute respiratory distress syndrome.
Observational indicators: The blood loss, duration of surgery and complications of the two groups were observed.
Tranexamic acid (TXA) has been recently used to reduce the blood loss after TKA.
Studies have shown that education programmes, be they web-based or using interventions like a visual aid, can improve the estimation of blood loss and subsequently improve clinical judgement and intervention.
Sean Kelly was 37 when he died of blood loss following the incident in Splott last summer and Aaron Bingham and Nicholas Saleh are on trial charged with his murder.
This appears to be quite relevant in our population at University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, where anemia is a common problem [9], as any significant amount of blood loss beyond what the individual mother/patient may be able to tolerate may compromise her hemodynamic status resulting in additional therapy, with increased healthcare costs.
The use of volatile agents, such as halothane and enflurane, has led to significantly increased blood loss. All inhalational agents were used at 1.5 MAC and above, and such concentrations would likely be avoided in current practice.