flow

(redirected from Blood flow)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

flow

 [flo]
1. the movement of a liquid or gas.
2. the amount of a fluid that passes through an organ or part in a specified time; called also flow rate.
forced expiratory flow (FEF) the rate of airflow recorded in measurements of forced vital capacity, usually calculated as an average flow over a given portion of the expiratory curve; the portion between 25 and 75 per cent of forced vital capacity is called the maximal midexpiratory flow. Called also forced expiratory flow rate.
laminar flow smooth, uninterrupted flow as of a gas through a tube.
maximal expiratory flow FEF200–1200; the rate of airflow at forced vital capacity, represented graphically as the slope of the line connecting the points 200 mL and 1200 mL on the forced expiratory volume curve. See also pulmonary function tests. Called also maximal expiratory flow rate.
maximal midexpiratory flow FEF25–75; the maximum rate of airflow measured between expired volumes of 25 and 75 per cent of the vital capacity during a forced expiration; represented graphically as the slope of the line connecting the points on the forced expiratory volume curve at 25 and 75 per cent of the forced vital capacity. See also pulmonary function tests. Called also maximal midexpiratory flow rate.
renal plasma flow (RPF) the amount of plasma that perfuses the kidneys per unit time, approximately 90 per cent of the total constitutes the effective renal plasma flow, the portion that perfuses functional renal tissue such as the glomeruli.
turbulent flow flow that is agitated or haphazard.

flow

(flō),
1. To bleed from the uterus less profusely than in flooding.
2. The menstrual discharge.
3. Movement of a liquid or gas; specifically, the volume of liquid or gas passing a given point per unit of time. In respiratory physiology, the symbol for gas flow is V and for blood flow is Q, followed by subscripts denoting location and chemical species.
4. In rheology, a permanent deformation of a body that proceeds with time.
[A.S. flōwan]

flow

(flō)
v.
1. To move or run smoothly with unbroken continuity.
2. To circulate, as the blood in the body.
3. To menstruate.
n.
1. The smooth motion characteristic of fluids.
2. Menstrual discharge.

flow

(flō)
1. To bleed from the uterus less profusely than in flooding.
2. The menstrual discharge.
3. Movement of a liquid or gas; specifically, the volume of liquid or gas passing a given point per unit of time.
4. rheology A permanent deformation of a body that proceeds with time.
[A.S. flōwan]

flow

(flō)
Movement of a liquid or gas;
[A.S. flōwan]
References in periodicals archive ?
Rehabilitation researchers should work towards a better understanding of how vascular changes (ie, reduction in blood flow, diameter) may hamper daily activity, walking performance, and cardiorespiratory fitness specifically after stroke.
In random order, the heated brass was applied to the skin for a period of 1 minute and changes in skin temperature, skin blood flow, and the temperature of the brass disc were measured continuously as described previously.
Researchers note that sample sizes were too small and follow-up time too short to reliably study the effects of this cerebral blood flow increase on structural brain measures and cognitive measures.
The objectives of this study were to determine mean cerebral blood flow in anemia secondary to chronic renal failure by doppler ultrasound and to compare the results with data gathered from healthy control subjects.
As useful as access blood flow studies can be for the early detection of complications related to high- and low-outflow fistulas, they must be performed in a manner that will produce reliable results.
(2001), which examined the effects of a faster blood flow rate on vascular access complications with contradictory findings, and by Borzou et al.
As a small study, the results provide only an indication of the effect of sweet taste on gastrointestinal blood flow and the effect of the sweet taste suppression using Gymnema sylvestre.
Study Plan: Following diagnosis, patients received a CDUS and testicular volume and blood flow were measured preoperatively.
Then, the body temperature was raised to 41.5[degrees]C using the temperature-controlled mat in approximately 60 min, and pulse rate, mean arterial blood pressure, and blood flow were monitored.
FFRCT technology solves complex equations simulating blood flow in the coronary arteries to provide mathematically computed fractional flow reserve values from images derived from non-invasive coronary CT Angiography.
Editor's Note: "This led us to wonder whether supplementing the body's naturally occurring selenide with an infusion of selenide might further protect tissues after a heart attack once blood flow is restored," Dr.
But by finding a case when neurons are busy with no corresponding change in blood movement, the new study shows that blood flow isn't always a reliable marker of neural activity.