coagulopathy

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Related to Bleeding disorders: hemophilia, Von Willebrand disease

coagulopathy

 [ko-ag″u-lop´ah-the]
any disorder of blood coagulation.
consumption coagulopathy disseminated intravascular coagulation.

co·ag·u·lop·a·thy

(kō'ag-yū-lop'ă-thē),
A disease affecting the coagulability of the blood.

coagulopathy

Hematology A clotting defect in which bleeding does not stop in the usual time period Etiology Hemophilia, drug-induced defects–eg, aspirin, thrombocytopenia, liver disease, Von Willebrand's disease. See Consumption coagulopathy, DIC, Leukemic coagulopathy.

co·ag·u·lop·a·thy

(kō-ag'yū-lop'ă-thē)
A disease affecting the coagulability of the blood.

Coagulopathy

A disorder in which blood is either too slow or too quick to coagulate (clot).
Mentioned in: Cerebral Palsy
References in periodicals archive ?
In 2010, Trinidad drafted the Bleeding Disorder Standard of Care bill, revised and filed by Sen.
The HAP sought the filing of the Bleeding Disorders Standards of Care Act of 2017, which aims to establish hemophilia treatment centers in key areas all over the Philippines, and better access to treatment for persons with hemophilia and related bleeding disorders.
Early this week, the group celebrated World Hemophilia Day, which was started by the WFH in 1989, at the Quezon City Circle and the municipal complex of Baliwag on Tuesday as part of the global campaign called "Light It Up Red" aimed at raising awareness on hemophilia and inherited bleeding disorders.
In several cases, the bleeding adverse event revealed a previously undiagnosed or undisclosed bleeding disorder. Bleeding adverse events in men with potential bleeding disorders are serious and can be fatal.
Shanghai RAAS plans to develop this antibody into a drug that can be used to treat bleeding disorders, as well as severe injuries.
Bleeding disorders are a group of inherited disorders with different prevalence rates depending on many ethnicities.
Inherited bleeding disorders (IBDs) should be suspected when there is a family history of a bleeding disorder or abnormal bleeding during early childhood, such as the neonatal period or infancy.
Better indicators of abnormally greater flow include flow lasting longer than 7 days, finding clots larger than a quarter, changing menstrual products every 1 -2 hours, leaking onto clothing such that patients need to take extra clothes to school, and any heavy periods that occur with easy bruising or with a family history of bleeding disorders.
During the 1970s and 1980s, blood products supplied to the NHS was contaminated with viruses such as HIV or hepatitis C and infected thousands of people with haemophilia or other bleeding disorders.
"Women with bleeding disorders are more likely to experience pain during their menstrual cycle (dysmenorrhea).
Bleeding disorders are known to treating physicians since the 16th century.
Types of bleeding disorders that may present with epistaxis include coagulation factor deficiencies, Von Willebrand disease, and several rare inherited platelet function disorders associated with defects in specific aspects of platelet function (Table 1).