bleeding diathesis

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bleeding diathesis

An increased susceptibility to bleeding due to a coagulation defect, which can be genetic (e.g., Haemophilia, Glanzmann disease, von Willebrand disease) or acquired (e.g., scurvy, vitamin-K deficiency, leukaemia).
References in periodicals archive ?
(2) In addition to trauma, bleeding diatheses, regional vascular anomalies, occipital surgery, and pituitary hemorrhage have all been described as inciting factors.
Brull, "Neuraxial techniques in obstetric and non-obstetric patients with common bleeding diatheses," Anesthesia and Analgesia, vol.
In this case, a 70-year-old man with bleeding diatheses due to a hyperfibrinolytic state caused by DIC related to a renal cell carcinoma was presented.
This can also be the first presentation of bleeding diatheses, requiring a full work-up.
[2] Other complications of varicella are myocarditis, corneal lesions, nephritis, arthritis, bleeding diatheses, acute glomerulonephritis and hepatitis.
This allows the physician to gain a better understanding of the patient's overall health and should include a detailed history of the patients comorbidities, prior surgeries including complications, current medications, social history, and family history, which can help reveal any potential bleeding diatheses.
There are 3 retrospective series confirming the safety of ureteroscopy and use of holmium laser energy in patients with uncorrected bleeding diatheses. In the first series, 9 patients (with mean stone size of 9.5 mm, range 4-15 mm) were treated successfully with 1 patient developing postoperative oliguria due to small ureteral clot that resolved spontaneously.
While the majority of excess bleeds are not related to haematological disorders, in certain series, bleeding diatheses accounted for 5 - 20% of underlying causes.
In the past decades, significant advances have been made in understanding coagulation disorders, including thrombophilias and bleeding diatheses. Anticoagulant therapy has advanced just as rapidly, leading to the development of several new classes of drugs that may be used to treat those coagulation disorders.
It is usually observed when the infant is 5-9 days old; signs include irritability, seizures, respiratory distress, jaundice, bleeding diatheses, shock, and often vesicular exanthema (3,4).
(14) Bleeding diatheses due to vascular malformations may give a bleeding pattern similar to platelet disorders, but is often more focal than diffuse.
Because bleeding is a common complication of these procedures, patients with uncorrectable bleeding diatheses may not be good candidates, especially for IGPNB using large cutting needles.