Blatchford score

Blatchford score

(blach′fŏrd)
[O. Blatchford, contemporary Scottish gastroenterologist]
An assessment tool to determine which patients with upper GI bleeding are likely to rebleed or die from hemorrhage and therefore which patients would benefit from urgent endoscopy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Furthermore, the other commonly used scoring systems [Rockall score and Glasgow Blatchford Score (GBS)] were designed for different endpoints to the one used by the authors.
A modified Glasgow Blatchford Score improves risk stratification in upper gastrointestinal bleed: a prospective comparison of scoring systems.
The Glasgow Blatchford score is the most accurate assessment of patients with upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage.
Outpatient management of low-risk patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding: can we safely extend the Glasgow Blatchford Score in clinical practice?.
Management of minor upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage in the community using the Glasgow Blatchford Score. Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol 2009; 21: 1340-6.
Doctors have created the Glasgow Blatchford Score (GBS), a clinical scoring system to determine the severity of internal bleeding, which will identify low-risk patients who can be treated as outpatients.
Glasgow Royal Infirmary consultant Andrew Stanley led the study into the Glasgow Blatchford Score, a scale which determines the seriousness of an injury.
The Blatchford score (an accepted measure of risk in patients with upper GI bleeding) was calculated using both clinical and laboratory data at each patient's presentation.
The best studied scoring systems are the Glasgow Blatchford Score (GBS) and the Clinical Rockall score [4-9].
Of these only 4 (1%) met our criteria for having a significant UGIB and 29 (74%) of these patients had a Blatchford score of 0.
Blatchford score [4] on the contrary takes into account only clinical criteria (hemoglobin, blood urea nitrogen, systolic blood pressure, pulse and the presence of melena, syncope, hepatic disease, or cardiac failure) but no endoscopic parameters.
These scores could be broadly divided into two categories: scores involving weighted endoscopic findings along with clinical and laboratory features (Rockall scores) and scores without the endoscopic criteria (AIMS65 and Blatchford scores).