Blastocystis hominis

Blas·to·cys·tis hom·i·nis

a species of Blastocystis widespread among humans, formerly considered harmless, now recognized as a rare cause of diarrhea and other intestinal symptoms and eosinophilia when found in heavy infections or immunocompromised hosts.

Blastocystis hominis

A single-celled protozoan parasite isolated from 5–10% of stool specimens in developed countries and up to 50% of specimens in developing countries, especially in those who work with animals.

Clinical findings
B hominis was long known to cause gastrointestinal disease in immunocompromised patients—e.g., recurrent diarrhoea, episodic vomiting, abdominal colic; B hominis infection may be misdiagnosed as irritable bowel syndrome. 

Nomenclature
Experts have proposed dropping hominis, the species name for Blastocystis sp. subtype nn (where nn is the number of each species group). It is phylogenetically included in the group Stramenopiles, which also includes brown algae, mildew, diatoms and the bacteria that caused the Irish potato famine.

Blastocystis hominis

(blăs′tō-sĭs″tĭs hŏm′ĭn-ĭs)
A protozoan once thought to be a harmless commensal in the human gastrointestinal tract but now believed to be an intestinal parasite that produces diarrhea, abdominal pain, bloating, and weight loss in some people.

Blastocystis hominis

a cause of diarrhea in the great apes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gastrointestinal tract: multiple parasitic infections--Cryptosporidium, Blastocystis hominis, giardia, tapeworms--yeast infections, residues of antibiotics, herbicides, pesticides, and inorganic and organic types of mercury.
A three-day stool parasitology found Dave was positive for Blastocystis hominis.
The plant is also used in the traditional medicinal system of Thailand for treatment of diarrhea and has been reported to inhibit the in vitro growth of the intestinal protozoan parasite, Blastocystis hominis (Sawangiaroen, 2005).
Q We have identified Blastocystis hominis in stool specimens submitted for routine ova and parasite examination and have only found the cyst stage.
A "grab bag" of pathogens was cultured from four patients--including Giardia lamblia, Blastocystis hominis, and Clostridium difficile--confounding the course of the Columbus investigation.
AIDS/HIV, Adenovirus, Aeromonads, Bartonella, Blastocystis Hominis, Campylobacter, Candida, Chancroid, Chlamydia, Clostridium, Coronavirus, Coxsackievirus, Cryptosporidium, Cyclospora, CMV, E.
An unusual case of invasive Blastocystis hominis infection.
One organism that frequent causes gastrointestinal dysfunction is Blastocystis hominis.