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blast

 [blast]
1. an immature stage in cellular development before appearance of the definitive characteristics of the cell; used also as a word termination, as in ameloblast and trophoblast.
blast cell.
2. the wave of air pressure produced by the detonation of high-explosive bombs or shells or by other explosions; it causes pulmonary damage and hemorrhage (lung blast, blast chest), laceration of other thoracic and abdominal viscera, ruptured eardrums, and effects in the central nervous system.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

blast

(blast),
General term for immature or precursor cell.
[G. blastos, germ]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

BLAST

Basic Local Alignment Search Tool. A nucleic acid- and protein-sequence comparison algorithm which is used to find matches in gene sequences and to search sequence databases for optimal local alignments to a query sequence.

BLAST uses a heuristic algorithm, seeking local alignments and creating a matrix of similarity scores for all possible pairs of residues, defining high-scoring segments, statistically evaluating the significance of the results and detecting relationships among sequences which share only isolated regions of similarity.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

blast

noun Hematology A general term for a primitive blood cell. See Blast cell, Blast crisis.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

blast

(blast)
General term for immature or precursor cell.
[G. blastos, germ]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

BLAST (Basic Local Alignment Search Tool)

a sequence comparison algorithm used to search DNA or PROTEIN databases. For example, BLASTN is used for homology searching to compare nucleotide sequences.

The query sequence is entered and compared with a nucleotide sequence database.

Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

blast

(blast)
General term for immature or precursor cell.
[G. blastos, germ]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Sound Blaster's audio revolution began with the creation of the first Sound Blaster 1.0 sound card in 1989, when it transformed PC audio forever.
In the second match Rawalpindi Angels defeated Quetta Fighters by seven wickets before chasing a 98 runs target in 10 overs and moved to the semi-finals on better run rate against Islamabad Blasters as both were tied 5-5 points each with two wins and a draw match due to heavy down pour.
The hero blaster will be auctioned in Las Vegas and online at juliensauctions.com on June 23 and has a pre-sale estimate of $300,000 to $500,000.
If the Bias-Tech E-11 Stormtrooper blaster was an organically flawed piece of hardware then somebody should likely alert the Emperor.
Bookmakers are struggling to split the teams but the Blasters are hard to beat at home and look the value bet.
These innocent-looking little dimpled balls are the rounds for Blasters like the Nerf Rival, a serious shooter that pops them out at 68 mph.
The original stationary shot blaster has been in operation for decades, but when the US Navy required a machine that could remove non-slip materials and paint from the floors of their aircraft carriers, the portable shot blaster was developed.
Sourav Ganguly, co- owner of Atletico de Kolkata, jumped in joy as his long- time friend and former teammate Sachin Tendulkar, co- owner of Kerala Blasters, wore a pensive look.
Blasters' bowlers had no answer to Challengers batsmen with all of them firing around the ground with Anmol Sharma in destructive mood.
Stamford, Conn.-based Mott's Fruit Blasters, the first nationally branded shelf-stable applesauce in a tube, has blasted its way into supermarkets.