Blast cells


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Blast cells: Blast crisis

Blast cells

Blood cells in early stage of cellular development.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
A diagnosis of T lymphoproliferative disorder would have been made based on these findings, although further complementary immunophenotyping by immunohistochemistry proved the blast cells to be also positive for CD123 which is more restricted to plasmacytoid dendritic cell marker.
Upon blood smear examination, numerous blast cells of varied origin were observed based on which leukemia can be classified as - Lymphoid leukemia and Myeloid leukemia.
Four patients were diagnosed with AML (50%) in the bone marrow of which more than 45% of blast cells were detected.
The bone marrow aspiration showed hemodiluted aspirate with blast cells. Immunophenotyping revealed 23% blast cells, positive for megakaryocyte markers (CD42b, CD41, CD61), myeloid markers (CD33), progenitor cell markers (CD117, CD34) and T cell marker--CD7 positive.
Several studies showed high sensitivity scores for the detection of blast cells in the PBS using digital imaging.1011 Unfortunately this was accompanied by relatively low specificity scores in the pre-classification, rendering the definitive result still subject to experienced manual observer validation." However, the high sensitivity makes digital imaging extremely suitable as a screening tool for the presence of blast cells in a PBS.
On comparing the average percentage of bone marrow blast cells in each disease subtypes, no significant differences were found and no association was noticed between the bone marrow blast cells percentage and the three subtypes of T-ALL (p = 0.060).
Image segmentation is the significant part of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia detection, because based on precise segmentation a classifier will be able to classify the normal and blast cells accurately [34].
CD56 was positive only for 3% of blast cells. The first induction cycle included cytarabine plus an anthracycline (idarubicin 12 mg/[m.sup.2] once daily on days 1-3 and cytarabine 200 mg/[m.sup.2] as daily continuous infusion on days 1-7).
Response to treatment was assessed regularly and at the end of 35 weeks she was found to have a palpable spleen (increased from 4 cm to 8 cm below the lower left costal margin) and leukocytosis at 245,000WBC/[mm.sup.3] including 32% blast cells. Platelet count and hemoglobin concentration were within normal ranges.
This approach provides descriptive information about the blast cells that is useful for disease monitoring, provides clues to molecular pathways involved in pathogenesis, and can help to select effective chemotherapeutic regimens.
A bone marrow aspirate was consistent with acute leukaemia, with 23% blast cells. In conjunction with the flow cytometry, the overall picture was suggestive of precursor T-cell ALL with aberrant expression of CD16.
Complete blood count was done by using Sysmex XS-800i and peripheral blood film stained by Giemsa stain to find the presence of blast cells as shown in Figure 1.