armband

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armband

A durable plasticised identification band placed around a patient’s wrist at the time of admission to a hospital, which contains basic information about the patient (name, hospital identification number, room number, caring physician, etc.).
References in periodicals archive ?
In wearing the black armbands ``we are mourning the death of democracy in our beloved Zimbabwe''.
But after FIFA reached a compromise with England, the SFA will mirror their gesture by wearing black armbands embroidered with the poppy.
CYCLISTS across Britain will wear black armbands this weekend in memory of the four North Wales riders tragically killed on an icy road.
I will wear a black armband as a sign of mourning and protest.
And the website's monitor Simoni wrote: "The word is spreading through the cycling world that as a mark of respect to the riders and to their families left behind, all cyclists that take to the roads on Sunday, January 15, either in group club runs as the Rhyl CC did, or on their own, as so many do every weekend, that people could wear a black armband of sorts.
He obviously could not be there at Anfield and the black armband spoke volumes for the 96 poor souls who died.
The jockey had donned a black armband and saluted Yeates with a wave of the whip as he passed the line.
He was the first black cricketer to play for Zimbabwe but had to flee the country after donning a black armband to protest against the "death of democracy" in his homeland.
Her trainer was a great friend of Alan Ball, a former Southampton and England team-mate, and jockey Sam Hitchcott wore a black armband as a mark of respect for the World Cup winner who died overnight.
So how come I didn't see a black armband being worn by Rangers keeper Allan McGregor?
Church removed his black armband and held it to the sky after getting on the end of a Kebe header to turn the ball in from close range after 26 minutes.
TIM CAHILL pointed to the black armband he was wearing as a sign of respect to those who have been affected by the bush fires that have ravaged his native Australia the past week.