Black Creek Canal virus


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Black Creek Canal virus

a species of Hantavirus in the U.S. causing hantavirus pulmonary syndrome; transmitted by the cotton rat.
[Black Creek Canal in Florida where the cotton rats were captured from which the virus was first isolated]

Black Creek Canal virus

a virus of the genus Hantavirus that causes hantavirus pulmonary syndrome.
A serologically distinct member of the Hantavirus group found in the southeastern US which may cause renal failure and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome

Black Creek Ca·nal vi·rus

(blak crēk kă-nal' vī'rŭs)
A species of Hantavirus in the U.S. causing hantavirus pulmonary syndrome; transmitted by the cotton rat.
[Black Creek Canal in Florida where the cotton rats were captured from which the virus was first isolated]
References in periodicals archive ?
Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in Florida: association with the newly identified Black Creek Canal virus.
Isolation of black creek canal virus, a new hantavirus from Sigmodon hispidus in Florida.
Genetic and serologic analysis of Black Creek Canal virus and its association with human disease and Sigmodon hispidus infection.
Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in Florida; association with the newly identified Black Creek Canal virus.
SNV in Peromyscus species rodents compared with Black Creek Canal virus in Sigmodon species rodents) will clearly meet the broad criteria for separate species status.
This assay would detect (but not distinguish among) infections by New York virus (from the white-footed mouse [15]), Prospect Hill-like viruses (from arvicoline rodents [30]), El Moro Canyon virus (from the Western harvest mouse [31]), Black Creek Canal virus (from the cotton rat [16]), and Bayou virus (from the rice rat [17]).
Pathogenesis of a North American hantavirus, Black Creek Canal virus, in experimentally infected Sigmodon hispidus.
However, evidence using Black Creek Canal virus and adult hispid cotton rats, Hantaan virus and Apodemus agrarius, and Puumala virus and Clethrionomys glareolus indicates that whereas viremia may diminish over time, virus can still be detected in various organs, including the salivary gland, for several months after infection (11 - 14).