leech

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leech

 [lēch]
any of the annelids of the class Hirudinea, especially Hirudo medicinalis; some species are bloodsuckers. Leeches were used extensively to treat various disorders and are still used occasionally to reduce postsurgical venous congestion, as in tissue flaps, grafts, or transplants.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

leech

(lēch),
1. A bloodsucking aquatic annelid worm (genus Hirudo, class Hirudinea) sometimes used in medicine for local withdrawal of blood.
2. To treat medically by applying leeches.
[A.S. laece, a physician; a leech, because of its therapeutic use]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

leech

(lēch)
n.
1. Any of various chiefly aquatic carnivorous or bloodsucking annelid worms of the class (or subclass) Hirudinea, of which one species (Hirudo medicinalis) was formerly widely used by physicians for therapeutic bloodletting.
2. Archaic A physician.
v. leeched, leeching, leeches
v.tr.
To bleed with leeches.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

leech

noun A segmented annelid of fresh water or soil in the tropics and subtropics; classic medicinal leech is Hirudo medicinalis, others include Poecilobdella, Dinobdella, Limnatis, Haemadipsa, Macrobdella Medical uses Remove excess blood from operative field; stimulate capillary ingrowth in reimplanted, traumatically amputated extremities and in plastic surgery; extract hirudin, a potent anticoagulant, and undelineated substances in leech saliva that inhibit tumor spread. See Hirudin, Limnatis nilotica verbTo treat with a leech, to let blood.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

leech

(lēch)
1. Any bloodsucking aquatic annelid worm, including those of the class Hirudinea, sometimes used in medicine and plastic surgery for local withdrawal of blood.
2. To treat medically by applying leeches.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

leech

1. An annelid worm of the class Hirudinea, some of which are blood-suckers. Leeches were formerly much used to withdraw blood, to reduce HAEMATOMAS and to attempt to treat varicose veins.
2. A facetious term for a medical practitioner.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

leech

an aquatic annelid of the order Hirudinea.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

leech

(lēch)
A bloodsucking aquatic annelid worm sometimes used in medicine for local withdrawal of blood.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
(151.) See David Kravets, How Mass BitTorrent Lawsuits Turn Low-Budget Movies Into Big Bucks, WIRED (March 31, 2011, 2:36 PM), http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/ 2011/03/bittorrenff.
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BitTorrent's sharing system is effective no matter where in the world viewers are.
BitTorrent (BT) is a very scalable Peer-to-Peer protocol for large scale content-distribution over the Internet.
users use the BitTorrent protocol to upload and download music,
The burgeoning rise of pirate spheres, including P2P file sharing through BitTorrent, is a phenomenon congruent with growing broadband access, particularly in urban India.
That difference in design means that people using BitTorrent Syne don't have to worry about whether the cloud company hosting their data is properly securing it against rogue employees or other threats.
According to Cnet, the BitTorrent Live doesn't rely on a single company's servers for recording a video and sending it out to viewers and instead has a broadcaster to send the video to viewers, who watch and send it to other viewers.
In this Note, I argue that the current legal framework in the United States concerning BitTorrent suits is not only subject to heavy abuse by copyright trolls, but the harm these suits seek to curtail might not in fact exist.
Specifically, we discover new torrents just after their birth by using the RSS service of the most important BitTorrent portal, namely The Pirate Bay.
Professionally produced films that are exchanged via BitTorrent often are unauthorized, and downloading them can increase your chance of exposure to a copyright infringement lawsuit.