peppered moth

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Related to Biston betularia: Peppered moth

peppered moth

the moth Biston betularia, which has been extensively studied in many areas of Britain. Its coloration is of two main types: peppered (a mixture of white and grey) and melanic (dark brown), the relative proportion of the two colour types in an area being related to the amount of atmospheric pollution. The colour forms are an example of a GENETIC POLYMORPHISM controlled by a single gene with two ALLELES, the allele for melanism being dominant. see INDUSTRIAL MELANISM.
References in periodicals archive ?
Industrial and non-industrial melanism in the peppered moth Biston betularia (L.).
En este solido ejemplo de dinamica evolutiva de las especies generado en la Inglaterra de comienzos de siglo fue posible relacionar el cambio historico en la composicion de las poblaciones de la polilla Biston betularia con el recubrimiento de los troncos de los arboles con hollin producido por las fabricas (Futuyma, 1998).
About the same time that Charles Darwin was tracking finches of the Galapagos to make his case for natural selection, a mutant form of the peppered moth, Biston betularia, appeared on trees in the industrialized midlands of England.
It is just the sort of change we see in the famed case of the Peppered Moth, Biston betularia. We start with a moth and end with a moth.
And with so many species using camouflage in as many amazing ways, biologists like Grant often focus on a sole species in his case the peppered moth (Biston betularia).
Biologists often invoke the function of a trait to explain observed differences in fitness between individuals.(12) In the peppered moth Biston betularia the function of melanism in polluted forests is to camouflage moths against soot-encrusted trees.
The awakening of interest in this "alternative picture" in part reflects a sense that the paradigmatic cases of natural selection, such as industrial melanism in Biston betularia and heavy-metals tolerance in grass species, may not exemplify the process of evolution with respect to unexceptional environmental factors and less simply determined functional traits (Sultan 1987).