Bishop score

(redirected from Bishop's score)

score

 [skor]
a rating, usually expressed numerically, based on specific achievement or the degree to which certain qualities are manifest.
APACHE score (acute physiological assessment and chronic health evaluation) a widely used method for assessing severity of illness in acutely ill patients in intensive care units, taking into account a variety of routine physiological parameters.
Apgar score a numerical expression of an infant's condition at birth, based on heart rate, respiratory effort, muscle tone, reflex irritability, and color; see also apgar score.
Bishop score a score for estimating the prospects of induction of labor, arrived at by evaluating the extent of cervical dilatation, effacement, the station of the fetal head, consistency of the cervix, and the cervical position in relation to the vaginal axis.
Silverman-Andersen score a system for evaluating the breathing of premature infants; see also Silverman-Andersen score.
stroke score any of various scoring systems that seek to characterize a patient's clinical state following a stroke.
trauma score a rating system used in the evaluation of patients with traumatic injury. Scores range from 1 to 15, with lower scores being associated with higher mortality rates.

Bishop score

(bish'ŏp),
system to determine the inducibility of the cervix in a pregnant patient, based on dilation, effacement, station, and cervical consistency and position.
[E. H. Bishop]

Bish·op score

(bish'ŏp skōr)
System to determine the inducibility of the cervix in a pregnant patient, based on dilation, effacement, station, and cervical consistency and position.
[E. H. Bishop]

Bishop score

(bish′ŏp)
A system for evaluating the potential for successful elective induction of labor. Factors assessed include fetal station, cervical position, effacement, dilation, and consistency. Each factor receives a score of 0, 1, 2, or 3, for the maximum predictive total score of 15. The lower the score, the greater the possibility that labor induction will fail.
References in periodicals archive ?
All patients were investigated and the Bishop's score was assessed.
Outcome measures such as change in Bishop's score, need of augmentation, and induction delivery interval and complications such as hyperstimulation, fever, and meconium passage were compared between the three groups.
Not surprisingly, the Bishop's score was the better predictor.
It initially appeared that the Bishop's score was significant in predicting success, but logistic regressional analysis of the data determined that it was only of marginal significance after adjustment for other significant predictors.
It initially appeared that the Bishop's score was significant in predicting success; however, multivariate, stepwise, logistic regressional analysis of the data determined that it was only of marginal significance when adjusting for other significant predictors.
The primary outcome variables were change in Bishop's score, induction to delivery (I-D) time, Apgar score, and incidence of abnormal uterine action.
Traditionally the Bishop's score is used to measure cervical status.
There was no significant difference in the outcome of mean induction to delivery interval between the two groups based on the initial Bishop's score.
Less than 4 Bishop's Score (0-3) was found in 58% of the cases in misoprostol group and 48% in oxytocin group.
After informed consent had been obtained, the patients selected for the study were evaluated initially by modified Bishop's Score and admission test for foetal wellbeing.
Most of the patients enrolled in our study had Bishop's score in the range of 5-8 at the time of admission.
After informed written consent had been obtained, patients were initially evaluated by modified Bishop's score & admission test for fetal wellbeing.